women

Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded to two women for the first time

The 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to two scientists for developing a gene-editing tool. Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna are the first two women to ever share the prize, BBC News reports.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Wednesday that Charpentier, who is French, and Doudna, an American, were awarded the prize for developing the CRISPR-cas9 genetic scissors. 

“Using these, researchers can change the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with extremely high precision,” says a press release. “This technology has had a revolutionary impact on the life sciences, is contributing to new cancer therapies and may make the dream of curing inherited diseases come true.”  

SPAIN-ASTURIAS-AWARDS-CHARPENTIER-DOUDNA
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna celebrate on the stage after receiving the 2015 Princess of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Research in 2015. 

MIGUEL RIOPA/AFP via Getty Images


The academy says since the women discovered the CRISPR-cas9

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women

Nobel Prize in Chemistry Is Awarded for Gene-Editing Technologies

Emmanuelle Charpentier, left and Jennifer Doudna, the winners of this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry, pictured in October 2015.



Photo:

miguel riopa/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

Two scientists won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for developing a method of genome editing that is contributing to new cancer therapies and providing a path toward cures for inherited diseases.

France’s Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna shared the prize awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm.

They investigated the immune system of a Streptococcus bacterium and discovered a molecular tool that can be used to make precise incisions in genetic material, making it possible to easily change the code of life, the academy said.

Upon hearing the news of the award, Dr. Charpentier, director of the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens, Berlin, said she hoped the method of

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