fashion

Informal Saudi ban on Turkish goods hits global fashion retailers

A de facto Saudi ban on Turkish goods has hit global fashion brands in the latest sign of the escalating rivalry between the regional powers.

Saudi Arabia has “banned all imports for made in Turkey products”, an employee at clothing group Mango told Turkish suppliers in an email seen by the Financial Times.

The Spanish company, which is one of a number of European and US fashion retailers with manufacturing facilities in Turkey, said in a statement that its teams “are looking into alternatives to the slowing down of custom processes for products of Turkish origin in Saudi Arabia”.

Mustafa Gultepe, head of Istanbul Apparel Exporters’ Association (IHKIB), said all retailers producing in Turkey and exporting to the Gulf state were affected. “We are talking about all global brands that have stores in Saudi Arabia, produce in Turkey and sell over there,” he told the FT. 

Turkish exporters have complained

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style

FIA approves ban on Racing Point-style ‘reverse engineering’

LONDON (Reuters) – Formula One’s governing body approved on Friday a ban on the sort of ‘reverse engineering’ that allowed the Racing Point team to compete this season with a car resembling last year’s title-winning Mercedes.

The FIA said its World Motor Sport Council (WMSC) had approved changes to the 2021 technical regulations “that will prevent the extensive use of reverse engineering of rival designs for the design of a car’s aerodynamic surfaces.”

Canadian-owned Racing Point caused controversy when their ‘Pink Mercedes’ was unveiled.

The design led to a protest by rivals Renault, with Racing Point fined 400,000 euros ($473,040) by stewards and docked 15 points for copying Mercedes’ 2019 brake ducts.

The team were allowed to continue competing without having to redesign the offending parts.

An appeal by those who wanted a tougher punishment, and by Racing Point against it, was dropped by all parties after the FIA issued

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wedding

Email points to ban on masks in coronavirus-stricken jail linked to Maine wedding

ALFRED, Maine — An email points to an outright ban on masks in housing units in a Maine jail dealing with a coronavirus outbreak that’s linked to a wedding and reception that made national news.

The York County Jail became a coronavirus hotspot after an employee who attended an August wedding more than 200 miles (320 kilometers) away in the Katahdin region spread the virus. The number of cases associated with the jail was approaching 90 as of Friday, and the number of cases linked to the wedding and reception has topped 170 with eight deaths.

The email obtained by news outlets said inmates were not permitted to bring masks into any housing unit, a policy that likely exacerbated the outbreak. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advocates mask-wearing to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

“Inmates are allowed to remove the masks from their faces when in

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gift

Activists call for action on gift ban bill before end of legislative session; four arrested in the process

Chanting “Pass the gift ban. Do your job” and “Stop taking bribes,” about 20 activists gathered in the hallway outside the Capitol office of House Majority Leader Kerry Benninghoff on Tuesday, demanding action on a bill making it illegal for public employees and officials to accept gifts.

The representatives from MarchOnHarrisburg said they have been waiting for action for four years and came to the Capitol with four members willing to risk arrest to remind House leaders of a pre-pandemic commitment from former House Speaker Mike Turzai and then-House Majority Leader Bryan Cutler to bring up House Bill 1945 for a vote by the full chamber.

It unanimously passed the House State Government Committee last October.

Knowing the Nov. 30 end of the legislative session is drawing near, Beth Taylor, the group’s Lehigh Valley chapter leader, said they don’t want the session to end without both chambers acting on this

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