women

Sue Bird and rest of league dedicated 2020 to more than basketball

It’s officially been over for almost a week, but it’s never too late to give the WNBA its flowers for an incredible 2020 season, one that will be remembered far more for the leadership and impact players made off the court than for the games on the court — though those were amazing too.

Before entering the “wubble,” confined to courts and housing at IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida, to minimize the risk of catching or spreading COVID-19 (something else they did quite successfully, by the way), players decided to dedicate the shortened season to racial justice and particularly Breonna Taylor, the young Black woman killed in her own home by Louisville Police officers in March.

Say her name, they demanded. Not just in the opening days or after the first couple of games, but for the entirety of the three months they held the regular season and playoffs: it

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women

UConn-Notre Dame women’s basketball game postponed a year

For the first time in seven years, the UConn and Notre Dame women’s basketball teams won’t play in the regular season.

The schools announced Monday that the game was postponed because the Irish need to restructure their schedule due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The perennial powers and former conference rivals extended their series last year through the 2023-24 season. That has been pushed back a year, with UConn hosting games next season and in 2023-24. The Irish will host the games in the other two years.

UConn coach Geno Auriemma said last week on a zoom call that he anticipated UConn playing all of its marquee non-conference games that included Baylor, Notre Dame, South Carolina and Tennessee. None of those games had been officially confirmed yet, as conferences are still trying to figure out their schedules.

Gallery: Big 12 football: Power rankings after Week Six (SMG)

Teams are allowed to

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women

The WNBA’s ‘wubble’ stood for activism, for Black women and for so much more than basketball

It’s officially been over for almost a week, but it’s never too late to give the WNBA its flowers for an incredible 2020 season, one that will be remembered far more for the leadership and impact players made off the court than for the games on the court — though those were amazing too.

Before entering the “wubble,” confined to courts and housing at IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida, to minimize the risk of catching or spreading COVID-19 (something else they did quite successfully, by the way), players decided to dedicate the shortened season to racial justice and particularly Breonna Taylor, the young Black woman killed in her own home by Louisville Police officers in March.

Say her name, they demanded. Not just in the opening days or after the first couple of games, but for the entirety of the three months they held the regular season and playoffs: it

Read More Read more
women

UConn-Notre Dame women’s basketball game canceled this season due to COVID-19 rescheduling

UConn and Notre Dame will not play in women’s basketball this season due to Notre Dame having to revise its schedule because of the coronavirus pandemic, UConn announced Monday.

The two women’s basketball powerhouses have played every year in the regular season since the 2013-14 season and every year, including the postseason, since 1994-95. They were supposed to play the first game of a four-year series this year but now this year’s rescheduled game will be added to the end of the series, for the 2024-25 season.

UConn’s complete schedule has not been released yet. The Huskies still have non-conference games against Tennessee, Baylor and South Carolina, as well as the Hall of Fame Women’s Challenge with games against Quinnipiac and the winner of Mississippi State-Maine Nov. 28-29 at Mohegan Sun Arena.

It would have been the first time UConn played Notre Dame without long-time coach Muffet McGraw, who retired

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women

Raegan Beers, nation’s No. 4 post, commits to Oregon State Beavers women’s basketball

The Oregon State Beavers women’s basketball program has established a tradition of landing some of the nation’s best talent on the recruiting trail.

In the class of 2020, Scott Rueck and his coaching staff secured commitments from Arkansas five-star guard/wing Sasha Goforth, while 2021 provided Greta Kampschroeder, the nation’s No. 14 guard, and Talia Von Oelhoffen, the No. 5 wing nationally.

On Monday, Oregon State extended its hot streak into the 2022 class, landing Colorado star Raegan Beers, the nation’s No. 22 overall prospect and No. 4 post player according to ESPN:

Beers, who visited Corvallis in January, is currently considered a four-star prospect, but ESPN bestows five-star status on its top 53 players by Signing Day each recruiting cycle, meaning she is almost certain to earn a fifth star before she arrives on campus.

As a sophomore, the 6-foot-2 post averaged 15.5 points, 10.1 rebounds (4.5 offensive rebounds), 1.6

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women

Waiting game wreaks havoc on women’s college basketball nonconference schedules

Gonzaga women’s basketball coach Lisa Fortier usually goes over the preseason schedule with her players at about the same time classes begin each year. She outlines practices, team retreats, days off — everything that is part of the annual routine leading up to the first tip.

This year being what it is, the Bulldogs couldn’t schedule that meeting until midway through September, more than two weeks after classes started. That was when the last player got to Spokane, Washington, an Australian freshman’s arrival slowed by the intricacies of international travel amid a pandemic. It was also when the NCAA assured everyone that there would, in fact, be a college basketball season.

Except that when Fortier and her staff set up the meeting, they realized they still

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style

WSU investigating basketball coach Gregg Marshall’s conduct

Wichita State University has ordered an independent investigation of alleged abuse by men’s basketball coach Gregg Marshall, the school confirmed Friday.

But in the meantime it will be business as usual for the team, as Marshall and the team will continue to prepare for the upcoming season as normal, the school said in a written statement.

Wichita State ordered the investigation into Marshall’s conduct by an outside law firm earlier this year and acknowledged it only after published reports by Stadium and The Athletic, two major sports news outlets.

One of those reports was the result of a six-month investigation by college basketball insider Jeff Goodman outlining a pattern of physical and verbal abuse by Marshall that has driven away some players.

Among the allegations in Goodman’s report, which was published by Stadium:

Marshall punched former Shocker center Shaquille Morris in the head during an October 2015 practice.

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clothing

Basketball star Mikey Williams helps rapper Drake launch clothing line

A high school basketball player in Mecklenburg County is part of an international clothing brand launch.

Seriously.

Five-star national basketball recruit Mikey Williams caused a stir when he announced last month he was moving to Charlotte from San Diego, bringing his prodigious basketball talent and 2.5 million Instagram followers with him. Williams, a 6-1 point guard, will play at Lake Norman Christian.

Wednesday night, Williams’ legend probably grew some more when he was featured in the introduction for a new clothing line developed by rapper/musician Drake and two urban clothing lines — A Bathing Ape (BAPE) and OVO.

OVO is Drake’s personal line. BAPE was created by a Japanese designer, Niko.

Williams is seen in the promotional video shooting hoops while wearing some of the clothes from the new line. It is unclear if Williams was paid or if his participation in the shoot will effect his NCAA eligibility.

Drake

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women

Indiana Women’s Basketball Motivated for Successful Season

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Teri Moren doesn’t care about outside expectations. She doesn’t care about rankings. Her players don’t care about them either.

Indiana women’s basketball has proven themselves over the last two seasons as a constant top 25 team in the nation, but they still feel like they have something to prove.

“Just how fast everything went down since March, and I think it’s one of the things that’s motivated them to be in the gym and work,” Moren said. “This has always been a very motivated group. They were last year. I don’t worry about the expectations for this group. I think they’ve been here long enough to know the success they’ve had is because of the work they’ve continued to do.”

For the first time in program history, the Hoosiers were on their way to back-to-back NCAA Tournaments — this time with a chance to host games at

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women

Transfer Bendu Yeaney gets waiver, can play for Arizona Wildcats women’s basketball team

Arizona’s hopes for a first outright Pac-12 women’s basketball title received a boost with the NCAA granting transfer Bendu Yeaney immediate eligibility for the 2020-21 season.

A 5-foot-10 junior guard who started 69 games in three years at Indiana, Yeaney will have two seasons of eligibility remaining with Arizona. She played in just six games for the Hoosiers in the 2019-20 season after returning from an Achilles injury at the end of the previous season.

Yeaney entered the transfer portal at the end of January, citing a desire to be closer to her Oregon home.

As a sophomore in the 2018-19 season, Yeaney averaged 9.7 points, 4.1 rebounds and 1.5 steals per game for the Hoosiers.

Yeaney and graduate transfer Trinity Baptiste, the reigning ACC Sixth

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