women

Joe Biden’s path to victory could hinge on working-class white women

Nicole Peyton sat out the 2016 election because she didn’t like President Trump’s behavior and believed Hillary Clinton was “tarnished.” But this year, the “conservative-leaning” homemaker plans to cast a ballot for Democrat Joe Biden.



Joe Biden holding a sign: Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks outside Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania on Tuesday. (Alex Edelman / AFP/Getty Images)


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Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks outside Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania on Tuesday. (Alex Edelman / AFP/Getty Images)

“He would be a better option. Anybody’s better” than Trump, said Peyton, 31, who dropped out of college to have her first child. Trump is a bad example for her five kids, she said as she picked up pizza for her family’s dinner on a recent Friday.

Whether women like Peyton decide to back Biden could determine who wins critical battleground states such as Michigan — which Trump won by 10,704 votes, or 0.23% — as well as Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. The demographic denoted by pollsters

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gift

Biden’s Gift-Wrapped Union Agenda Would Make Bernie Blush

Attempting to assuage concerns that his candidacy for president is a stalking horse for far-left policies, Joe Biden recently reminded reporters in Wisconsin that he “beat the socialist” in the Democratic primary.

Indeed, Biden vanquished Bernie Sanders as a candidate; but the Vermont senator can take pride in the fact that his policy agenda has all-but-conquered key components of Biden’s platform, including the former vice president’s plan to revitalize labor unions.

In a gaffe-ridden livestream on Labor Day, Biden told the AFL-CIO that, if elected president, he’d ensure unions would “never have a better friend or a stronger ally in the White House.” Indeed, Biden backs a suite of far-reaching proposals that would benefit both private-sector and government unions while harming American workers, businesses, and taxpayers.

In July, the “Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force” released a list of progressive policy recommendations for Biden’s campaign. The presidents of each of the

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style

Four reasons Biden’s campaigning-free campaign style won’t survive 2020, win or lose

Joe Biden has pursued an unorthodox strategy of running for president that involves not campaigning. Since March, Biden has rarely left his house. He holds few events, doesn’t give many interviews, and as of late, has wrapped up his public schedule early in the morning.

There has been some speculation about whether, if he proves successful, his 2020 campaign strategy will change how candidates run for office. But win or lose, there are several reasons Biden’s strategy is unlikely to be replicated in future presidential elections. Here are four of them:

Biden’s name recognition: It’s very rare for a challenger to be as well-known as Biden. Already somebody who served in the Senate for decades, Biden was in the public eye for eight years as vice president, including his personal struggle with grief after his son’s death from cancer. Typically, somebody challenging an incumbent needs to introduce himself to voters,

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