gift

Doctor accepted bike ‘gift’ from Sutton ‘cleared off’ British Cycling’s budget

Dr Richard Freeman accepted a free bike worth several thousands of pounds as a “gift” from Shane Sutton that was “cleared off” the British Cycling budget, a medical tribunal heard.



a man standing in front of a crowd: Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images

Related: Giro fears grow as Mitchelton-Scott and Jumbo-Visma exit after Covid positives

Freeman had previously told the tribunal that he was “terrified” of the former British Cycling head coach – and also said in his witness statement that Sutton had wanted him to sign off £6,000 of cosmetic dental treatment while the two men worked together.

However under cross-examination by Simon Jackson QC, counsel for the General Medical Council, Freeman stated that he had “regrettably” accepted a sponsor’s bike from Sutton, believed to be a Pinarello Prince worth several thousands of pounds, which he subsequently gave to his wife.



a man standing in front of a crowd: Shane Sutton pictured at the London 2012 Olympics. Richard Freeman says he was ‘terrified’ of the former British Cycling head coach.


© Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images
Shane Sutton pictured at the

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fashion

6 British high street fashion names that could still be saved

It has been one of the toughest years in history for all retailers, globally. In Britain, some of our biggest and most popular firms remain jittery following abrupt store closures during the first stage of lockdown in spring, plus there is a general drop in consumer spending to contend with, as people have less occasions to buy new clothes for. John Lewis announced several shop shutterings amounting to 1,300 job losses, Marks & Spencer will axe 7,000 jobs, and Clarks will cut 50 out of its 345 UK shops.

But for certain high street brands which were already under pressure before the coronavirus crisis, the challenges of this year have pushed them to the brink – or over it, in many cases. The administration packages now being negotiated for these brands, often with foreign investment firms, typically prioritise a future of online-only trading, rather than in bricks-and-mortar retail. As well

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jewelry

British Designer Monica Vinader Discusses The Evolution Of Her Demi-Fine Jewelry Brand

Monica Vinader established her eponymous jewelry brand in 2008, and since then the accolades, awards and high moments have rolled in thick and fast.

Not only has the designer launched boutiques across London, and established concessions within Liberty and Selfridges, she’s also collaborated with influencers and dressed a whole host of celebrities, from The Duchess of Cambridge and Madonna, to Bella Hadid, Naomi Watts, Elizabeth Olsen and Kate Winslet. Whatever the woman, Vinader has something for you.

All this goes to show that Monica Vinader has certainly made a name for herself within demi-fine jewelry arena. Expect yellow gold, rose gold and silver metals that are thoughtfully combined with gems such as aquamarine, onyx, then there’s pearls and of course, diamonds for everyday adornment.

More is more and so, there are plenty of pieces designed to be stacked including rings,

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fashion

On Racism and British Fashion

Why did you go into fashion?

My father was a carpenter, and my mother owned a dressmaking business. At 10 years old, I could cut patterns, sew and even buy chiffon and haberdashery, and I would make burqas and dresses for my sisters’ dolls.

My family was very artisanal, but that came out of necessity. Creativity is very much a middle-class luxury. That’s something I came to realize when I left home and encountered a whole new set of codes when I went to study, first at London’s School of African and Oriental Studies, then Central Saint Martins and Cambridge University, and later when I entered the world of fashion.

What was it like being a young, brown British fashion designer in the Noughties?

Personally, I was going through a period of real rebellion, from going to university and clubbing to drugs and coming out. Professionally, at some level, it

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