women

Meghan Duggan, captain of the Olympic-winning US women’s hockey team, will retire

Meghan Duggan, a captain on the US women’s hockey team that captured gold in the 2018 Olympics, is retiring.



a person wearing a helmet: USA's Meghan Duggan looks on in the women's preliminary round ice hockey match between the US and Canada during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Kwandong Hockey Centre in Gangneung on February 15, 2018.  / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski    (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)


© BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images
USA’s Meghan Duggan looks on in the women’s preliminary round ice hockey match between the US and Canada during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Kwandong Hockey Centre in Gangneung on February 15, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Duggan spent 14 years with the national team, and made the announcement Tuesday in an essay shared with ESPN.

“Although being an athlete will always be part of my identity, I am ready for the next chapter. I know it’s the right decision for me, but at the same time, it’s still very emotional,” Duggan said in the essay.

Duggan played in 137 games for the US national team, lighting the lamp with 40 goals and dishing out

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women

Meghan Duggan, United States women’s hockey team captain, announces retirement

meghan-duggan.jpg
Getty Images

United States women’s hockey star Meghan Duggan announced her retirement Tuesday in an essay that was published on ESPN. Duggan, 33, was the captain of the United States squad that won a gold medal at the 2018 Olympics — the country’s first gold medal in two decades. The Wisconsin graduate is the only man or woman to captain both a gold-medal winning Olympic hockey team and an NCAA championship team.

“Hockey literally changed my life,” Duggan wrote. “I put on a pair of skates as a toddler and grew up through the sport. It’s been one of the greatest privileges of my life to play for Team USA. While being an athlete will always be part of my identity, I am ready for the next chapter.”

Duggan was a star on the ice. She debuted with the national team in 2007at 19, when she was a freshman at

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women

United States women’s hockey captain Meghan Duggan retiring

Meghan Duggan, captain of the U.S. women’s hockey team that won Olympic gold in 2018, is retiring.

Duggan, who had a 14-year stint with the national team, announced her retirement in an essay published Tuesday by ESPN.

“Hockey literally changed my life,” Duggan wrote. “I put on a pair of skates as a toddler and grew up through the sport. It’s been one of the greatest privileges of my life to play for Team USA. While being an athlete will always be part of my identity, I am ready for the next chapter.”

Duggan, 33, played in 137 games for the U.S. women’s national team, scoring 40 goals and 35 assists. She won seven gold medals at the IIHF world championships and was part of three Olympic teams — winning silver in 2010 and 2014 and taking home gold in 2018 — the American women’s first Olympic gold in 20

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gift

Bledisloe Cup: Wallabies vs All Blacks, Michael Hooper, Captain, 100 Tests, Dave Rennie, Michael Cheika

Michael Hooper has always been ahead of the game in some way or another.

At just 19 years old and a fresh graduate from St. Pius X College in Chatswood, Hooper was thrown his Super Rugby debut for the ACT Brumbies.

Six years on, he’d become the youngest player to record 100 appearances having already skippered the Waratahs to their maiden title in 2014 in place of the injured Dave Dennis.

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Michael Hooper of the Wallabies looks dejected at a wet Newcastle. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)
Michael Hooper of the Wallabies looks dejected at a wet Newcastle. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)Source: Getty Images

By then he had already written his name into Australian rugby folklore.

In 2014, Hooper (22 years and 268 days) was unveiled as Wallabies captain – the youngest since the great Ken

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