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Nobel Prize Winners In Chemistry And Physics Discuss Shattering Gender Norm, Redefining Women’s Roles

The first Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded 119 years ago, and on Wednesday for the first time in its history, two women won without having to share the prize with a man. Their groundbreaking development may shift the perception of women in scientific roles, and continue to disrupt the centuries-old mindset that women are second to men in innovation or in any field. 

Dr. Jennifer Doudna, a biochemist at UC Berkeley and French researcher Dr. Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Max Planch Institute accepted the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic scissors, a

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Two women share chemistry Nobel in historic win for ‘genetic scissors’

Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and Jennifer DoudnaImage copyright
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Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and Jennifer Doudna began a formidable partnership in 2011

Two scientists have been awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing the tools to edit DNA.

Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna are the first two women to share the prize, which honours their work on the technology of genome editing.

Their discovery, known as Crispr-Cas9 “genetic scissors”, is a way of making specific and precise changes to the DNA contained in living cells.

They will split the prize money of 10 million krona (£861,200; $1,110,400).

Biological chemist Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede, commented: “The ability to cut DNA where you want has revolutionised the life sciences.”

Not only has the women’s technology been transformative for basic research, it could also be used to treat inherited illnesses.

Prof Charpentier, from the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Berlin, said it was

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2 women win Nobel Prize in chemistry for gene-editing method

The scientists’ work allows for laser-sharp snips in long strings of DNA, permitting researchers to precisely edit specific genes to remove errors that lead to disease.

“There is enormous power in this genetic tool, which affects us all,” said Claes Gustafsson, chair of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry. “It has not only revolutionized basic science, but also resulted in innovative crops and will lead to groundbreaking new medical treatments.”

“My greatest hope is that it’s used for good, to uncover new mysteries in biology, and to benefit humankind,” said Doudna, who is age 56 and works at the University of California at Berkeley.

But many have cautioned that the technology must be used carefully. In 2018, Chinese scientist He Jiankui revealed he had helped make the world’s first gene-edited babies, to try to engineer resistance to future infection with the AIDS virus. His work was publicly condemned as unsafe human

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Two women win Nobel Prize in chemistry for work on CRISPR gene-editing system

Emmanuelle Charpentier, left, and Jennifer A. Doudna, together won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for their work on the CRISPR gene-editing tool. <span class="copyright">(Susan Walsh / Associated Press)</span>
Emmanuelle Charpentier, left, and Jennifer A. Doudna, together won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for their work on the CRISPR gene-editing tool. (Susan Walsh / Associated Press)

The Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded Wednesday to UC Berkeley biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna and French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier for their pioneering work on the so-called CRISPR tool for gene editing, a discovery that holds out the possibility of curing genetic diseases.

The Nobel Committee said the two women’s work on developing the CRISPR method of gene editing, likened to an elegant pair of “molecular scissors,” had transformed the life sciences by allowing scientists to target specific sequences on the human genome.

This could, for example, allow doctors to correct the DNA error that causes sickle-cell anemia. It also paves the way for improving plants and livestock by imbuing them with greater disease resistance, and for safer transplants of animal organs

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2 women earn Chemistry Nobel Prize for gene-editing tool CRISPR

The 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry went to two women who developed a gene-editing tool called CRISPR-Cas9, which snips DNA like a pair of molecular scissors. 



a close up of a flower: illustration of crispr-cas9 snipping a bit of DNA from a strand


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illustration of crispr-cas9 snipping a bit of DNA from a strand

The technique “has not only revolutionized basic science, but also resulted in innovative crops and will lead to ground-breaking new medical treatments,” Claes Gustafsson, chair of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry, said in a statement. With the ability to deftly slice specific DNA sequences from the genome, scientists can pinpoint the functions of genes; these discoveries both add to our basic understanding of how those genes work and can have practical applications, such as for growing drought- and pest-resistant crops and developing therapies for cancer and genetic disorders. The genetic cut-and-paste system is also being used in new COVID-19 diagnostic tests.

The Nobel “for the development of a

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The Nobel Prize in chemistry has gone to the two women who pioneered CRISPR gene editing

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2020 was awarded today to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna “for the development of a method for genome editing” called CRISPR. 

Genetic scissors: The Nobel Committee cited Doudna and Charpentier for an “epoch-making” experiment in 2012 in which they determined how to use CRISPR to cut DNA at sites of their choosing. Since then, the “genetic scissors” technology has revolutionized lab research and has already been tested on patients as a way to cure blindness and sickle-cell disease. It has also been used to create gene-altered corn, pigs, and dogs—and, more controversially, humans. The technique is so powerful because it’s simple to use, involving just one specialized DNA-cutting protein and a “guide” molecule that can direct it anywhere in a genome. 

The split: The prize is the first Nobel to be shared only by two women. But after their groundbreaking collaboration, the team quickly

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Creators of gene ‘scissors’ clinch Nobel as women sweep chemistry

By Niklas Pollard and Douglas Busvine

STOCKHOLM/BERLIN (Reuters) – Two scientists won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for creating genetic ‘scissors’ that can rewrite the code of life, contributing to new cancer therapies and holding out the prospect of curing hereditary diseases.

Emmanuelle Charpentier, who is French, and American Jennifer Doudna share the 10 million Swedish crown ($1.1 million) prize for developing the CRISPR/Cas9 tool to edit the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with precision.

“The ability to cut the DNA where you want has revolutionized the life sciences,” Pernilla Wittung Stafshede of the Swedish Academy of Sciences told an award ceremony.

Charpentier, 51, and Doudna, 56, become the sixth and seventh women to win a Nobel for chemistry, joining Marie Curie, who won in 1911, and more recently, Frances Arnold, in 2018.

It is the first time since 1964, when Britain’s Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin alone

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Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded to two women for the first time

The 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to two scientists for developing a gene-editing tool. Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna are the first two women to ever share the prize, BBC News reports.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Wednesday that Charpentier, who is French, and Doudna, an American, were awarded the prize for developing the CRISPR-cas9 genetic scissors. 

“Using these, researchers can change the DNA of animals, plants and microorganisms with extremely high precision,” says a press release. “This technology has had a revolutionary impact on the life sciences, is contributing to new cancer therapies and may make the dream of curing inherited diseases come true.”  

SPAIN-ASTURIAS-AWARDS-CHARPENTIER-DOUDNA
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna celebrate on the stage after receiving the 2015 Princess of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Research in 2015. 

MIGUEL RIOPA/AFP via Getty Images


The academy says since the women discovered the CRISPR-cas9

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Two women share Nobel chemistry prize for gene-editing discoveries

This year’s Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US for their pioneering work in developing the Crispr gene editing technique that has transformed biology research.

The “genetic scissors” developed by Professors Charpentier and Doudna have had a transformational impact, enabling researchers to change the DNA of animals, plants and microbes far more precisely than older genetic engineering techniques.

“It has not only revolutionised basic science but also resulted in innovative crops and will lead to groundbreaking new medical treatments,” said Claes Gustafsson, chair of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry, on Wednesday.

The chemistry prize has never before been shared by two women. “My wish is that this will provide a positive message to the young girls who would like to follow the path of science, and to show them that women in science can also have an impact through

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Nobel Prize in Chemistry Is Awarded for Gene-Editing Technologies

Emmanuelle Charpentier, left and Jennifer Doudna, the winners of this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry, pictured in October 2015.



Photo:

miguel riopa/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

Two scientists won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for developing a method of genome editing that is contributing to new cancer therapies and providing a path toward cures for inherited diseases.

France’s Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna shared the prize awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm.

They investigated the immune system of a Streptococcus bacterium and discovered a molecular tool that can be used to make precise incisions in genetic material, making it possible to easily change the code of life, the academy said.

Upon hearing the news of the award, Dr. Charpentier, director of the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens, Berlin, said she hoped the method of

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