fashion

Fashion companies have canceled or refused to pay for $16.2 billion of orders during the pandemic, costing textile workers $1.6 billion in wages, a report found



a group of people sitting at a table: Textile workers in Bangladesh K M Asad/Picture Alliance via Getty Image


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Textile workers in Bangladesh K M Asad/Picture Alliance via Getty Image

  • Garment suppliers lost around $16.2 billion in orders from the US and Europe in just three months, a report from workers rights groups said.
  • Brands either canceled orders or delayed payments for existing orders, sometimes indefinitely, the groups found.
  • This led to about $1.6 billion in lost wages for factory workers, the report found.
  • Canceled orders and payments have affected more than one million workers in Bangladesh, the report found. Many were sent home without severance or furlough pay.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Garment factory workers around the world may have collectively lost more than $1.5 billion in wages in just three months thanks to US and European fashion companies canceling or delaying orders, workers’ rights groups have said.

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Brands canceling orders, or failing to pay for existing orders,

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model

Navisite Research Finds More Than One-Third of Companies Caught Unprepared to Support Large-Scale Work-from-Home Model

ANDOVER, Mass., Oct. 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Navisite today unveiled new research that found more than one-third (36%) of companies were not prepared to support such a large-scale and abrupt transition to a remote workforce, following “shelter-in-place” mandates issued to prevent the spread of COVID-19. As a result, more than half of the organizations polled (51%) experienced IT pains during the transition process, with a subset (29%) reporting they are still facing issues.

Navisite polled more than 100 C-level executives and IT professionals in the U.S. to understand the impact of this massive workforce relocation on business operations. Key findings from the survey include:

  • Before COVID-19, only 14% of companies had more than half of their employees working from home. Post COVID-19, more than 64% of companies have more than half of their workforce remote.
  • 36% of respondents admit their organizations were not prepared for the immediate shift to
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beauty

Lubrizol Accelerator Program a thing of beauty to some brands as it helps companies develop new products

When Curan Mehra wanted to develop a concentrated hand soap pod that would dissolve in water and dispense as a foam, he contacted the Lubrizol Corp., best known for creating specialty chemicals for transportation and industry.

He and his father, Sanjiv, the CEO of EOS Products, a multinational skin care company, wanted to work with the 92-year-old, Wickliffe-based company’s new accelerator program, which helps startup beauty brands develop and manufacture new products.

While the Mehras had access to their own chemists and had never worked with Lubrizol, they felt the accelerator provided an advantage. Not only could Lubrizol’s chemists help create a formulation for the pod, but the company also provided testing and other resources to help bring a sustainable, new product to market.

“The team was very enthusiastic about the product,” Sanjiv Mehra said.

Brandon Ford, chief accelerator officer for Lubrizol Life Science, said he and his team, based

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women

After one of tech’s biggest conferences for women postponed its career fair, attendees organized their own with recruiters from companies like Apple and Google



a sign on a stage in front of a crowd: The Grace Hopper Celebration is the world's largest conference for women in computing. Anitab.org


© Anitab.org
The Grace Hopper Celebration is the world’s largest conference for women in computing. Anitab.org

  • Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC), one of the largest conferences for women in tech, recently postponed its annual career fair due to technical difficulties.
  • Many students rely on the career fair as a way to land jobs and internships at some of the biggest tech companies like Apple and Google. 
  • In response, some attendees have come together to arrange an alternative option for candidates and recruiters to connect. 
  • Companies like Dropbox, are also hosting their own live interactive networking events and 1:1 chats to meet conference attendees and recruit diverse candidates. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC) is one of the largest conferences for women in tech.

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The event boasts more than 30,000 participants and over 300 partners from major tech companies like Apple, Google, Facebook, and

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women

UKG Named 2020 Top Companies for Women Technologists Winner by AnitaB.org

UKG (Ultimate Kronos Group), a leading global provider of HCM, payroll, HR service delivery, and workforce management solutions, announced today that the company has been named the 2020 Top Companies for Women Technologists Winner by AnitaB.org in the category of 1,000–10,000 technical employees. The national program recognizes companies building workplaces where women can thrive in technology, and UKG was named the Winner for having the highest overall score of any company with a medium-sized technical workforce.

“What an incredible honor to be named the #1 medium-sized company by AnitaB.org Top Companies for Women Technologists,” said Dave Almeda, chief people officer at UKG. “AnitaB.org is an amazing organization dedicated to growing the impacts of women in technology by connecting, informing, and inspiring them. We are proud of our programs developed to support equality and will continue to do our part to ensure a more diverse and inclusive industry and society,

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women

Companies Need To ‘Lean In’ As Pandemic Threatens Women’s Progress : NPR

The pandemic is eroding progress made by women in the workplace, a new report by Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In foundation finds.

Dominic Lipinski/PA Images via Getty Images


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The pandemic is eroding progress made by women in the workplace, a new report by Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In foundation finds.

Dominic Lipinski/PA Images via Getty Images

As a champion for women “leaning in” at work, Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer at Facebook, is worried.

The coronavirus pandemic, and related issues like lack of childcare and school, are taking a disproportionately heavy toll on working women, with effects that will be felt for years to come, according to a new report from Sandberg’s Lean In foundation and McKinsey & Company.

The sixth annual Women In The Workplace report found that 1 in 4 women are considering scaling back

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women

7 companies in the tech space that were founded by women of color

It’s no secret that Black entrepreneurs are less likely to receive venture capital funding. Historically, the same has been said for female entrepreneurs. So, you can imagine that the odds are stacked against you if you are a woman of color trying to set up a business.

Despite this, there are countless women of color doing incredible things in industries all over the world, specifically the tech space. And I wanted to do some shouting about a select number of said entrepreneurs. So, here are seven incredible tech companies that were founded by amazing women of color.

Angela Benton, Founder & CEO of Streamlytics

Angela Benton is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Streamlytics, which uses first-party media consumption data to bring transparency to what people are streaming on today’s most popular streaming services while helping consumers own their data in the process.

She is a pioneer of diversity

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fashion

Bourbon And Boots? Why Fashion May Be Beverage Companies’ New Growth Market

Bourbon and boots? Old Rip Van Winkle one of the expressions in the Van Winkle family’s iconic whiskey range has teamed up with footwear and apparel maker Wolverine to produce a limited-edition boot that celebrates American craftsmanship.

American whiskey brands have co-branded items other than beverages before, but this is one of the first times that an American spirits brand has ventured into the world of luxury fashion.

Is this just an isolated case inspired by a good cause or is it indicative of a nascent trend that may see beverage companies move further into the world of co-branded luxury fashion goods? Could this the next big thing in the spirits industry?

Over the last several decades the emergence of ultra-expensive expressions has steadily

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women

Sheryl Sandberg: Companies and Women Are at a Crossroads

A crisis is looming in corporate America: More than one in four women are considering downshifting their careers or leaving the workforce.

This is a central finding of the 2020 Women in the Workplace report by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Co., the largest study of its kind. For the past six years, our study has revealed slow but measurable progress for women at all levels of management. Now all those gains could be wiped out in a single year. Up to two million women could leave their jobs. If we had a panic button, we’d be hitting it.

During Covid-19, no one is experiencing business as usual. But women have been affected the most—three groups in particular.

First, working mothers were already working a “double shift”—a full day of work, followed by hours of work at home—before the pandemic. With many schools and child-care options closed, that double shift has

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women

As Women Fight to Maintain Progress, Companies Need to Reimagine How They Operate

For years, American corporations tried to increase job flexibility with scant success. The pandemic ushered in more flexibility, along with added responsibilities and few boundaries. For women, who typically shoulder more duties at home regardless of their breadwinning status, that has felt less like freedom than pressure to be always on.

We’re seeing the consequences in our sixth annual Women in the Workplace study, a joint effort by McKinsey & Co. and LeanIn.Org that is the largest annual benchmark of women’s progress in American corporations. More than one in four women say they may now quit or scale back their jobs. Among women at the managerial level and above, 30% want to step down or out. As a group, women could lose more than five years of gains across the career pipeline.

This is not simply a pause on the road to a more equitable workplace. This year’s report finds

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