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White House Warns Coronavirus Spreading In “A Very Different Style” In Fall

Cooler weather is leading to more indoor socializing among families and friends, which leads to people taking off their masks. It’s a move which White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx warns is leading to “troubling signs” of an increased viral spread.

Birx already sees the Northeast experiencing a rise of new cases.

“What we’re seeing in the community is much more spread occurring in households and in social occasions, small gatherings where people have come inside, taken off their mask to eat or drink or socialize with one another,” Birx said Thursday at a roundtable discussion at the University of Connecticut in Hartford, Connecticut.

The new pattern mimics that seen in Southern states at the beginning of summer, she said, when people began heading to indoor areas to escape heat and humidity.

Birx said people relax precautions they may take in more public locations when among family

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wedding

Micro Wedding Coronavirus Personal Essay

I didn’t grow up imagining what my wedding would look like. But I did always assume I would get married.

I was lucky enough to have had a happy, fairly conventional childhood. I grew up in a small town in upstate New York in a traditional family of four, with parents who’ve now been married for 36 years. From my limited perspective, that’s just what adults did: they got married.

When I met Tom, or rather met him again, I was nearing 30 and starting to lose faith in my assumption about getting married. After four years of many, many failed attempts at forming a romantic relationship out of the desperate game that is dating in New York City, I was starting to feel like I was never going to find a boyfriend, much less a husband.

Tom and I had worked together for three years at Scientific American

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Fashion designer dies, Cleveland Browns attendance upped, White House cases, more – coronavirus timeline Oct. 3-9

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Here is our regular roundup of coronavirus facts, figures and numbers regarding Cleveland, Ohio, the United States and the world Oct. 3-9:

Oct. 3: CNN says only three states – Texas, Missouri and South Carolina – are reporting a decline in new cases compared to last week, as the country hit its highest daily rate in almost two months. Twenty-one states report an increase in cases. Chris Christie, former New Jersey governor and aide to President Trump, announces he tested positive. He joins several other prominent figures who tested positive, including Kellyanne Conway and Ronna McDaniel, chairwoman of the Republican National Committee. CBS News reports that the California governor’s office, in a Tweet, suggests restaurant-goers keep their masks on “in between bites.”

Oct. 4: Trump leaves the hospital and takes a ride with Secret Service members, drawing criticism for leaving a quarantined and controlled health environment. The

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women

Women Are Better Than Men at Wearing Masks and Following Coronavirus Precautions, Study Finds

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In most states, people are required to wear a mask in public places to prevent the further spread of COVID-19. But women do a far better job of wearing masks than men, a new study found.

Women are also more likely than men to follow all COVID-19 precautions, like washing hands, staying home and social distancing. Plus, they’re more likely to follow news about the virus from medical experts, their governor, social media and by reading about how other countries have handled the pandemic — and in turn, experience anxiety and alarm.

For the study, published in the journal Behavioral Science & Policy, researchers at New York University and Yale University surveyed 800 people about their COVID-19 habits, counted mask-wearers on the street over two days and analyzed Americans’ movements with smartphone data.

RELATED: COVID-19 Cases Dropped 15 Percent in South Carolina Areas with Mask Mandates, Increased Without

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Actress Jane Fonda: Coronavirus is ‘God’s gift to the left’

Jane Fonda’s remark came during an online event as she highlighted the importance of voting and how it can decide what happens to humanity.

WASHINGTON — Actress and activist Jane Fonda said during an online event last week that the coronavirus was “God’s gift to the left.” She made the remark while expressing how the virus has opened people’s eyes to what she said was President Donald Trump’s true character.

Fonda’s remarks came during a conversation she had with Maurice Mitchell, the national director of the Working Families Party, a political party that describes it’s as fighting “for workers over bosses and people over the powerful.” 

During her very last question of the interview, Mitchell asked Fonda for her opinion on the “concept of maybe a political realignment, a social realignment, and the ending dying of this patriarchal system and possibly the beginning of something regenerative.”


“I just

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wedding

White House chief of staff hosted wedding in May that flouted local coronavirus guidelines

Haley Meadows Kocher, daughter of White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, got married in Atlanta on May 31, amid the coronavirus pandemic, with a ceremony that violated local caps on social gatherings.



Mark Meadows wearing a suit and tie: White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speaks to the media about US President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, DC, October 2, 2020. - Meadows addressed the positive Covid-19 tests of US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump. "They remain in good spirits. The president does have mild symptoms and as we look to try to make sure that not only his health and safety and welfare is good, we continue to look at that for all of the american people," Meadows said. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)


© SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speaks to the media about US President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, DC, October 2, 2020. – Meadows addressed the positive Covid-19 tests of US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump. “They remain in good spirits. The president does have mild symptoms and as we look to try to make sure that not only his health and safety and welfare is good, we continue to look at that for all of the american people,” Meadows said. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)

The gathering is yet another example of administration officials actively

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wedding

Mark Meadows threw a 70-person indoor wedding for his daughter, flouting coronavirus restrictions.

Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, hosted his daughter’s Atlanta wedding indoors in defiance of state and municipal guidelines that at the time limited gatherings to 10 people or less.

The wedding, held at Atlanta’s Biltmore Ballrooms in May, was first reported Thursday by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. It took place early in the coronavirus pandemic, as Americans were canceling or postponing their own weddings and other long-planned gatherings to comply with public health restrictions aimed at slowing the spread of the virus.

Photographs from the May 31 event, posted online, show no masks or distancing among the crowd of several dozen tuxedo-clad attendees.

In one image, Mr. Meadows can be seen delivering a father-of-the-bride speech before a band with at least eight members. Another shows a 21-member wedding party posing with the newly married couple. Mr. Meadows and his wife, Debbie, are shown during the recessional walking together

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Report: White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows ignored coronavirus rules at wedding

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows hosted a large wedding for his daughter that appeared to violate a Georgia order and city of Atlanta guidelines aimed at stopping the spread of COVID-19, an Atlanta newspaper reported Thursday.

Photos of the event show that social distancing guidelines were not followed during the May 31 nuptials at the Biltmore Ballrooms Atlanta, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

About 70 guests, including U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio, wore tuxedos and ball gowns but no masks at the indoor wedding, and photographs show groups of people clustered closely together in the same room throughout the evening, the newspaper said.

Gov. Brian Kemp’s orders at the time banned gatherings of more than 10 people. The governor later loosened some coronavirus restrictions.

Meadows did not respond to the newspaper’s requests for comment.

The weekend of the Atlanta wedding was a chaotic one in Washington, D.C., and

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women

Married women are losing jobs, highlighting coronavirus inequities

  • Married women lost 1 million jobs in September alone, while single men and women gained jobs.
  • The dip in married women in the workforce, economists say, could be due to the difficulty of childcare amid the back-to-school season.
  • Women shoulder most of the burden at home, according to studies from Boston Consulting Group and Northwestern University.
  • At some point, women then have to choose between performing well at work and at home, explaining the dip in employment for those who are married.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Back-to-school season is tough enough on working parents. This year, it’s devastating — and for one group in particular. 

According to the newest count from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, married women lost almost 1 million jobs in September. Meanwhile, married men lost nearly 800,000 jobs, and both single men and women steadily earned jobs back.

“This month the number

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women

Women are excluded from global coronavirus coverage, experts say

“NEVER tell a woman (professional or otherwise) that she cannot speak with authority,” she wrote later on Twitter. “NEVER tell us we aren’t educated enough, experts enough, or good enough. We have every bit as much authority to speak.”

The exchange underscored a broader concern over the lack of female voices in media coverage of and policy debates on the coronavirus pandemic.

In coverage of the coronavirus, female scientists and doctors are cited far less frequently than their male counterparts, according to multiple multicountry studies. And when women are vocal, as with other policy debates and key areas of coverage, they often face online harassment and second-guessing of their expertise, several female scientists told The Washington Post.

The consequences are far-reaching. The marginalization of female experience and expertise colors the information available to policymakers forming coronavirus responses — which means interests and issues important to women may get underprioritized.

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