shopping

Shopping centre owners still struggling to collect rent in Covid crisis

Struggling retailers increased the amount of rent paid to their landlords in September compared with three months earlier but still left property owners waiting to receive more than half of rental payments.



a large building: Photograph: Richard Saker/The Observer


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Photograph: Richard Saker/The Observer

Landsec, the property group behind the Trinity Leeds shopping centre and Bluewater in Kent, said that it had collected only a third of rents from its retail tenants, five working days after they were due, compared with 82% of rental payments from office tenants.

The Covid-19 crisis has taken a toll, with the company saying that a year earlier it had collected 89% of retail rents and almost all (98%) office rents during the same timeframe.

Overall, it received just under two-thirds (62%) of rent due in September from all of its commercial tenants, down from 95% a year earlier.

It was a similar picture at the rival property

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women

Opinion | Gina M. Raimondo, Mary Kay Henry: Women are bearing the brunt of the economic crisis. They have to lead our recovery plans.

Even before the pandemic exposed deep disparities in our economy and society, the gender wage gap persisted at every level of income and education. In 2019, two-thirds of minimum-wage workers were women. Women carry two-thirds of all student debt in the United States. Black women graduate with significantly more debt than White men and take longer to pay it off, as they earn just 62 cents for every dollar earned by White men. In 2019, nearly a quarter of female-headed households lived in poverty; for households headed by Black or Latina women, the rates were closer to 30 percent.

Only if our recovery is inclusive can we emerge from this crisis stronger.

Inclusivity requires state leadership as well as a comprehensive national strategy to ensure women’s economic security, health and safety. Front-line workers in the pandemic have struggled to keep patients safe amid inadequate staffing and insufficient protective gear such

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shopping

Rumaan Alam On Crisis, Capitalism, & Grocery Shopping



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It wasn’t long into the lockdown in March that my grocery lists began to resemble prayers. Not the kind of prayer that functions as a plea to any god, exactly, but rather the kind that serves as a pledge toward the future, a promise for another day. At that point, nothing felt certain; nothing felt under control. But as I wrote out lists of what I needed to buy, as I planned out what I would need to make enough meals to get through the week, the days — mornings, afternoons, nights; breakfasts, lunches, dinners — began to make sense, began to feel certain, if not fully under control. 

Three boxes of pasta (a tube-y kind; rotini, if they have it)

Two cans crushed tomatoes (the big ones)

One can whole peeled tomatoes 

Three tins of anchovies

A prayer is a bargain.

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women

Number of women on Germany executive boards shrinks during crisis year

Blue-chip German companies have fewer women in board positions than a year ago. Photo: Daniel Roland/AFP via Getty Images
Blue-chip German companies have fewer women in board positions than a year ago. Photo: Daniel Roland/AFP via Getty Images

Unlike in the US, UK, and other developed economies, the number of women on the management and supervisory boards of DAX-listed German companies has fallen in the past year.

According to a study from the Swedish-German AllBright Foundation, there were only 23 female managers on the boards of the 30 companies that make up Germany’s elite DAX index (^GDAXI) — down from 29 women a year ago — and a drop from 14.7% to 12.8% in the past year. This puts the number of women board-members back to the same level as in 2017.

“The crisis has made it particularly clear that diversity at the corporate level of German companies is still not firmly anchored,” said the managing directors of the Allbright Foundation Wiebke Ankersen and Christian Berg.

The drop in

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women

Brazilian Women Innovate More Than Men Through Covid-19 Crisis

Female entrepreneurs in Brazil have been more agile and effective when implementing technology-based innovation and finding digital alternatives to keep their businesses afloat in by the Covid-19 pandemic than their male counterparts, according to research.

The seventh study on how small companies are faring in the crisis carried out by Brazilian business school Fundação Getúlio Vargas (FGV) and the Brazilian Service of Support for Micro and Small Enterprises (SEBRAE) with 7.586 businesses between August 27-31 across Brazil shows that most female business owners (71%) use social networking websites, apps or Internet platforms to sell their products or services, compared with 63% of the male entrepreneurs polled.

The research has shown that most women run their businesses from their homes (35%, compared with 29% of men). It also noted that the general

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women

Report advocates self-determined solutions to systemic problems underlying the ongoing crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Report advocates self-determined solutions to systemic problems underlying the ongoing crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Cora McGuire-Cyrette, Executive Director, ONWA
Cora McGuire-Cyrette, Executive Director, ONWA
Cora McGuire-Cyrette, Executive Director, ONWA
ONWA Report: Reconciliation with Indigenous Women: Changing the Story of MMIWG (2020)
ONWA Report: Reconciliation with Indigenous Women: Changing the Story of MMIWG (2020)
ONWA Report: Reconciliation with Indigenous Women: Changing the Story of MMIWG (2020)

Toronto, ON, Oct. 04, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Today, as Sisters in Spirit vigils are being held across the country, the Ontario Native Women’s Association (ONWA) has released a detailed report outlining key areas of concern and recommendations for moving forward in ending violence against Indigenous women and girls. It comes after the one year mark since the Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

The report, titled: Reconciliation with Indigenous Women: Changing the Story of MMIWG (2020), centers Indigenous women, their knowledge and experience, as not only the

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shopping

Ratings Shopping Never Died in CMBS Market Now Facing Crisis

(Bloomberg) — It was considered one of the root causes of the global financial crisis, and regulators have spent over a decade trying to stamp the practice out. Yet Kroll Bond Rating Agency Inc.’s $2 million fine this week shows how in the securitized-debt market, the battle against ratings shopping was never truly won.



a clock on the side of a building: U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission headquarters in Washington, D.C.


© Bloomberg
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Kroll settled with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over its failure to adhere to credit-rating standards for commercial-mortgage bonds and collateralized loan obligations, just months after rival Morningstar Credit Ratings LLC was hit with an even larger penalty by the regulator.

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The recent fines are fueling concerns that rosy credit grades are masking deeper structural problems with the securities. The risks are particularly acute in the CMBS market, where shutdowns stemming from the coronavirus pandemic have battered revenues for malls, hotels and

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women

How the Coronavirus Crisis Threatens to Set Back Women’s Careers

Kate Deisseroth spent two decades building a career as an orthopedic surgeon that now, in the Covid era, looks precarious.

As the single mother of twin 10-year-olds in Lebanon, Pa., the Air Force veteran made pre-pandemic life run like clockwork with an intricate schedule of early school drop-off, after-school programs and babysitters who watched her sons when she was called to the hospital for emergencies.

That support system all fell away when the pandemic struck and her boys’ school went online.

Though her boss and colleagues rallied around her, helping her lobby for permission to consult with patients from home and taking on some of her work, she is looking into nonclinical jobs with predictable hours in case her sons’ school returns to online learning this fall.

Dr. Deisseroth has no illusions about the consequences of such a drastic move: “As a surgeon, you can’t take a year or two

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