qrendiscouts
jewelry

Fort Collins’ Meanwhile Back at the Ranch to close after decades

CLOSE

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Last SlideNext Slide

With “retirement sale” signs bannering her Old Town Square storefront, Ann Stephens looked up from her work behind the glowing display cases of turquoise bolo ties, silver money clips and shelves of handmade Native American rings, bracelets and necklaces Friday morning.  

Dressed in a crisp white blouse and khaki pants, Ann’s simple attire was offset by gleaming pieces from her own jewelry collection — a sparkling silver bracelet, an heirloom silver and turquoise pin, a pair of rings and a silver pendant necklace inlaid with a stack of small, multicolored stones.

I was there to discuss her pending retirement and the forthcoming closure of her store, Meanwhile Back at the Ranch, which has been a must-stop for Native American jewelry, art and artifacts since opening at 3 Old Town Square in 1993.

Ann obliged, dutifully running me through the 27-year history

Read More Read more
women

As Dr. Javaid Perwaiz faces trial, the women he treated question decades of care

CHESAPEAKE, Va. — The last time Brittni DuPuy-German saw her trusted gynecologist, she once again explained that the stabbing, mystery pain in her abdomen had not gone away.

It first appeared two years earlier, after she said her doctor, Javaid Perwaiz, surgically tied her tubes. To fix it, he had proposed more surgery — three additional procedures in nine months that she said included a hysterectomy when she was 29. But the pain persisted.

So on Nov. 8, 2019, at his private-practice office, Perwaiz and DuPuy-German discussed the possibility of yet another surgery, she said. He scheduled an ultrasound for just days later, a sign of the efficiency that DuPuy-German had come to expect from her family’s longtime gynecologist. He was her mother’s doctor, her sister-in-law’s doctor, her best friend’s doctor. Perwaiz had delivered DuPuy-German and delivered her children.

Which is why, when her phone buzzed the day after her

Read More Read more
gift

It took decades and a lot of faith for Colorado Springs pianist to chase his musical gift | Lifestyle

You could call them angels, those who have saved John Redmon’s life in one way or another.

There’s his mother, Cynthia, who noticed her 3-year-old throw down his toys when a song came on the TV to pretend-play the keys along to the beat. Cynthia, a pianist herself, began to pass on the gift a couple years later. Redmon remembers sitting next to her on a church piano bench while his little fingers hit one note at a time to form the melody of “Jesus Loves Me.”

There’s the man who called 16 years ago about Redmon coming to sing at a Baptist church in Colorado Springs. Redmon left his life in Atlanta behind for the gig and has never looked back.

And there’s Louis Armstrong, whose voice Redmon relies on to make money as an impersonator.

But, personally, Redmon tends to reserve the word “angel” for a woman by

Read More Read more
women

COVID is Reversing Decades of Progress for Rural Women and Girls

When Idris and I visited Sierra Leone last December, the optimism was palpable. The country was back on its feet after a bitter civil war and an Ebola outbreak in 2014. We met resourceful, resilient women like Isatu, a mother of four, who was transforming swampland into paddy fields with the help of the UN’s International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). She trusted IFAD because it had not abandoned her village when Ebola struck. The agency stayed and supported farmers with access to finance in their most desperate hour.

Back in December, we did not know that a pandemic was about to hit us. And while its impact on our lives in the West has been chronicled exhaustively, we hear little about its effect on the most vulnerable people of all – the 1.7 billion women and girls, more than one-fifth of all humanity, who live in rural areas around

Read More Read more
women

This recession threatens to wipe out decades of progress for U.S. women

Women helped pull the U.S. economy out of the last recession. This time around they are falling behind.

The pandemic is disproportionately affecting women and threatening to wipe out decades of their economic progress. As the crisis drags on, some of the biggest pain points are among women of color and those with young children.

These setbacks — characterized by some economists as the nation’s first female recession — stand in sharp contrast to the dramatic progress women made in the expansion following the last financial crisis. The jobs, income and promotions that women lose as a result of the coronavirus could hold back economic growth and sideline an entire generation of women.

The official data is stark. The September unemployment rate for Black and Hispanic adult women remains above 10%, even though it’s decreased to 6.9% for White women, according to data reported Friday by the Labor Department.

At

Read More Read more
women

Pandemic may set women back for decades: report

The COVID-19 pandemic may have long-lasting consequences for women, a new report says

As if the threat to health and livelihoods stemming from the coronavirus pandemic wasn’t enough, a new report suggests that the lasting impact might be devastating for women, in particular.

Read More: Gabrielle Union, NBC reach settlement over racist workplace allegations

Bloomberg reported Wednesday that for Black and Hispanic women those projections are even worse. They say more than 10% of Black and Hispanic women remain unemployed during the public health crisis and it’s unknown what the future may hold.

Close-up of three African American girls wearing surgical masks. 3 young women sitting together using coronavirus protection measures after or during quarantine. (Credit: Adobe Stock)
Close-up of three African American girls wearing surgical masks. 3 young women sitting together using coronavirus protection measures after or during quarantine. (Credit: Adobe Stock)

In May of this year alone, the unemployment rate for Black women, which had rebounded somewhat for white women, was $16.5%, the highest rate recorded since the 80s.

One of the reasons

Read More Read more
women

The First Female Recession Threatens to Wipe Out Decades of Progress for U.S. Women

(Bloomberg) — Women helped pull the U.S. economy out of the last recession. This time around they are falling behind.

The pandemic is disproportionately affecting women and threatening to wipe out decades of their economic progress. As the crisis drags on, some of the biggest pain points are among women of color and those with young children.

These setbacks — characterized by some economists as the nation’s first female recession — stand in sharp contrast to the dramatic progress women made in the expansion following the last financial crisis. The jobs, income and promotions that women lose as a result of the coronavirus could hold back economic growth and sideline an entire generation of women.



chart: Uneven Joblessness


© Bloomberg
Uneven Joblessness

The official data are stark. The unemployment rate for Black and Hispanic adult women remains above 10%, even though it’s decreased to 7.3% for White women, according to data from the

Read More Read more