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clothing

New film ‘Bottega Veneta: Men’ examines identity and clothes.

“You can be whatever you want, can’t you?” asks English artist Dick Jewell at the open of Bottega Veneta: Men, the short film from Daniel Lee, creative director of the Italian fashion house, and filmmaker Tyrone Lebon. That question, along with others, centers the project’s exploration of what exact qualities make a man.

Men is Lee’s first film since joining Bottega Veneta in 2018, and features Jewell alongside London musician Obongjayar, English producer and MC Tricky, Swedish singer-songwriter Neneh Cherry, Irish actor Barry Keoghan, Scottish dancer Michael Clark, the mysterious young Roman, English painter George Rouy, and Italian-born Richard Bolle, who is the principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre.

Throughout the film, its subjects confront traditional notions of masculinity, which they present as limiting and even damaging. “In my youth, I’d never seen men make physical contact apart from punching each other,” Clark says wearing an all-black Bottega

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wedding

Muriel’s Wedding star Gabby Millgate reveals which iconic line was almost cut from the film

Muriel’s Wedding star Gabby Millgate reveals why her famous line ‘You’re terrible, Muriel!’ was almost cut from the classic Australian film

She is best known for delivering the famous line ‘You’re terrible, Muriel!’ in the ’90s film Muriel’s Wedding.

But Gabby Millgate, who played the character of Joanie Heslop, has now revealed that the iconic moment was almost cut from the movie.

The 50-year-old actress said that director P.J. Hogan had originally wanted to cut the line, but award-winning editor Jill Bilcock convinced him to keep it.  

Famous phrase: Muriel’s Wedding star Gabby Millgate (pictured) has revealed why her famous line ‘You’re terrible, Muriel!’ was almost cut from the classic Australian film

‘I was sure it was going to be cut from the movie,’ Gabby said, in an interview with

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women

Lakeland director’s film encourages girls and women to pursue aviation careers

Lakeland filmmaker Katie McEntire Wiatt made her directorial debut with her documentary “Fly Like a Girl” in 2019 when the film hit the festival circuit, including the Sarasota Film Festival. Now, it has been acquired by Gravitas Ventures and will be available for wide release on-demand and in select theaters starting Oct. 9.

The documentary is about females in aviation, from pilots to an airport operations manager, professionals in the aerospace industry and young women aspiring to be astronauts, like Taylor Richardson.

A few of the women featured include retired NASA astronaut Nicole Stott; Vernice “FlyGirl” Armour, recognized by the Department of Defense as the United State’s first African-American female combat pilot; and Shaesta Waiz, who made history by becoming the youngest woman to fly solo around the world in a single-engine aircraft and as the first female certified civilian pilot from Afghanistan.

The interview subjects tell their stories,

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women

Lenovo and Ava DuVernay unveil VR film series on empowering women

“Storytelling is an exchange of information; it’s also an exchange of emotions,” Ava Duvernay said. She was speaking at the virtual launch event for New Realities, a project in collaboration with Lenovo and the UN’s Girl Up leadership development initiative. The project features the stories of 10 young women around the world using technology to make a difference or pursue their dreams, and are all told in 360-degree videos that you can watch for free on Lenovo’s site today. You won’t need a VR headset to experience the 6- to 10-minute shorts — the YouTube player supports desktop and mobile viewing too.

“It’s an exchange that allows for understanding,” DuVernay added. “I think that in order to create global change, in order to move our societies to more positive places, we have to understand that we’re more alike than we’ve been told.”

The series looks at the stories of

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clothing

The Social Dilemma: A Horror Film in Documentary Clothing

Rawpixel/Shutterstock

Source: Rawpixel/Shutterstock

Watching Netflix’s The Social Dilemma was interesting and disturbing.  It was interesting to see how it was constructed and disturbing to see that many of the psychological techniques vilified by the documentary were used to tell their story.   As a persuasive piece of media, it is very successful.  Part documentary, part drama, it hits all the anxiety triggers of the last few years.  The content is compelling and frightening and also one-sided.  The issues raised are serious and important, but not new.  The call to action is to put down your smartphone and back away, not slowly but post-haste.  Not only is that totally unrealistic, it leaves people less equipped and more afraid, especially during a pandemic when technology can be a lifeline.

There are a lot of smart people interviewed in The Social Dilemma.  Many of them were part of the tech crowd that developed

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fashion

Discover a Fashion Film Series Celebrating Black Excellence From In the Blk

Last week, designer Victor Glemaud revealed what he’s been working on over the last few months. It was not a look book for a new spring 2021 collection, but instead, a look forward into a new and more inclusive future for the industry. Glemaud launched a new organization called In the Blk, which is a networking concept for Black designers and creatives around the world. Founding members include stylist Jason Rembert, designers Virgil Abloh, Carly Cushnie, Thebe Magugu, and many more, all of whom will work to provide connections and resources to Black fashion and creative businesses large and small. The idea is to break down the traditional entry barriers to the industry, those that have historically shut out BIPOC individuals as well as unknown names. The founding members meet virtually every Friday via Zoom or phone to discuss new initiatives and provide mentorship to those like designers Abrima Erwiah

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beauty

BBC Radio 5 live – Kermode and Mayo’s Film Review, Sally Hawkins, Eternal Beauty, On the Rocks and The Trial of the Chicago 7

Mark and Simon are joined by Sally Hawkins who talks about her new movie. Plus your essential streaming and cinema reviews including The Trial of the Chicago 7 and On the Rocks.

Mark and Simon are joined by Sally Hawkins who talks about her new movie Eternal Beauty.

Plus your essential streaming film reviews including Aaron Sorkin’s star-studded drama The Trial of the Chicago 7, Sofia Coppola’s On the Rocks, about a young mother reconnecting with her larger-than-life playboy father on an adventure through New York, starring Bill Murray, Rashida Jones and Marlon Wayans.

Mark and Simon also talk you through the best and worst films on subscription-free TV next week.

They also recommend a home entertainment purchase in DVD of the Week and count down the top 10 films at the UK box office.

00:32:24 Box Office Top 10
00:44:07 A Perfectly Normal Family
00:47:27 Sally Hawkins

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fashion

Meet Prize Fest 2020’s film, food, fashion, and music competitors

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Film Prize 2018 Top 20 Announcement Party Friday evening at the Robinson Film Center.

Shreveport Times

Prize Fest 2020 returns with its first all-virtual event series running Oct. 2-11.

Prize Fest encompasses the flagship event Louisiana Film Prize and its counterparts Music Prize, Food Prize, and Fashion Prize. The series is presented by the Prize Foundation, whose mission is “to educate, energize, and incentivize the local creative community and stimulate the northwest Louisiana economy.”

The event showcases the talents of the finalists who have much to gain from gaining new fans and followers to the grand prize cash awards at stake.

Prize Fest 2020 will be presented as an all-virtual festival Oct. 2-11, 2020. (Photo: Courtesy Photo/Prize Fest)

The audience gets to go along on their journey as viewers, and the virtual experience offers interactive and engaging elements to put them right in the action.

The COVID-19 pandemic caused

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fashion

Sterling Ruby Weighs In on His Fashion Week Film, Building a Brand, and His ‘More Fears Than Hopes’ for the U.S.A.

What do you see as the benefits of participating in an organized Fashion Week and speaking to the fashion world?

I see the fashion world as somewhat parallel to the art world. This isn’t a complete or definitive statement, of course. Both art and fashion have hollow, empty aspects, but they also share brilliant, thoughtful moments. Some of my best friends operate within fashion, and more often than not, our interests and projects run through both worlds—conceptually, formally, politically, etc. As I continue to make work between genres, increasingly it’s about deciding what medium best serves the current iteration of an idea and how to maintain a sense of fluidity through these areas. Participating in an organized Fashion Week is an opportunity to commit to a specific context, one that is tied to wearability and the body. I appreciate the sense of occasion—it’s a moment for many different designers to

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