women

Women Moving Million’s Executive Director, Sarah Haacke Byrd, Shares Details about A New $100 Million Campaign For Global Gender Equity

On September 30th 2020 Women Moving Millions, a community of nearly 350 women philanthropists committed to mobilizing millions for gender equity, hosted their 9th summit, The Power of Us. Virtually bringing their community together from across the globe, they engaged dynamic speakers such as Jamia Wilson, Laverne Cox, and Vicki Saunders to discuss the need for mobilizing catalytic resources to gender justice during this incredibly difficult time for women and girls around the world. Citing recent data that showcases the impact of the current pandemic, members learned of the realities of women and girls at this present moment in time and were invited to #GiveBold and #GetEqual by stepping into Women Moving Millions’ new $100 million campaign for gender equity. 

With 750 million girls out of school, rising domestic and sexual violence as

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women

What Women Can Do Right Now To Advocate For Gender Equality

Melinda Gates created Pivotal Ventures, an investment and incubation company, to advance social progress in the United States, enabling better lives for more people. Their primary mission is for every individual to have an equal opportunity to improve their lives and the lives of others.  In June of this year, they joined with other funders to launch the Equality Can’t Wait Challenge, which will provide forty million dollars to support big, bold solutions to expand women’s power and influence in the United States. 

The Equality Can’t Wait Challenge is a chance to put resources behind people and ideas that don’t often get the support they need. In the United States, gender equality is chronically underfunded. In fact, the arts receive nearly five times more private charitable funding than women’s issues according to data from

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Watch: ‘A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing II – The Gender Agenda’ | Nachricht

IRONDALE, Ala., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — (EWTN) EWTN’s new film, “A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing II – The Gender Agenda,” examines the origins and depravity of the so-called Sexual Revolution, with its current emphasis on gender dysphoria and homosexuality, and explains how the battle over marriage and family will be won.

EWTN’s new film, “A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing II – The Gender Agenda,” examines the origins and depravity of the so-called Sexual Revolution, with its current emphasis on gender dysphoria and homosexuality, and explains how the battle over marriage and family will be won. The film airs at 10 p.m. ET Thursday, Oct. 15; and Saturday, Oct. 17. The Oct. 17 airing will be preceded at 8:30 p.m. ET by the original “A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing” documentary, which explores the rise of Marxism in the U.S.

The film airs at 10 p.m. ET Thursday, Oct. 15; and Saturday, Oct. 17. The Oct. 17 airing will be preceded at 8:30 p.m. ET by the original “A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing” documentary, which explores the rise of Marxism in the U.S.

The new film begins with Jean Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, whose existential philosophy started a dumbing-down of the culture. But the two-hour program really shines in its exposure of Alfred Kinsey’s fake science and child abuse, which kicked off the Sexual Revolution, and its corresponding assault on marriage and family.

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women

Nobel Prize Winners In Chemistry And Physics Discuss Shattering Gender Norm, Redefining Women’s Roles

The first Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded 119 years ago, and on Wednesday for the first time in its history, two women won without having to share the prize with a man. Their groundbreaking development may shift the perception of women in scientific roles, and continue to disrupt the centuries-old mindset that women are second to men in innovation or in any field. 

Dr. Jennifer Doudna, a biochemist at UC Berkeley and French researcher Dr. Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Max Planch Institute accepted the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic scissors, a

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women

Black women sue Denver over alleged racial, gender discrimination in fire department

Two Black women sued the city of Denver on Wednesday over allegations that members of the Denver Fire Department systematically discriminated against them both because of their gender and their race.

Da Lesha Allen and Charmaine Cassie say they unfairly faced tougher standards and stricter scrutiny than their white male colleagues, and that colleagues and supervisors made racist comments about their hair and bodies and applied racist stereotypes to the women after they joined the department in 2019 and 2018, respectively.

One fire captain told Cassie that she would struggle to get through the fire department’s training program because of the department’s culture, and said that she should “keep her head down and act like a slave” in order to graduate from the training, according to the lawsuit.

A lieutenant commented several times on Cassie’s body, including declaring that she had a “big butt,” according to the federal lawsuit. In

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women

How a lack of confidence among women led to the gender gap in tech

  • Matthew J. Liberatore and William Wagner are business professors who studied performance across men and women in mid-level jobs, and asked research subjects to rate how they thought they did. 
  • While there were only insignificant differences in performance, they found women were strikingly less confident in how they performed than men. 
  • It’s hard to know why this is the case, but studies suggest women tend to believe they’re less skilled at STEM-related tasks, including math and technology. 
  • Narrowing the gender gap is going to require more than simply promoting equality in the workforce — schools, universities, and companies need to start initiatives to boost confidence in young women to go into STEM fields. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In the workplace, women are now as good as men when it comes to computing performance, but there is still a gender gap when it comes to confidence, according to

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women

Women Founders of AI Startups Take Aim at Gender Bias

When Rana el Kaliouby was pitching investors in 2009 on her artificial-intelligence startup, Affectiva, she and her co-founder tried to steer clear of what she calls the “e-word”—emotion.

They were both women, and though their startup was designed to detect emotion in technology, they were sensitive to how they would be perceived. They feared they might not be taken seriously because “emotion” wasn’t in the traditional lexicon of many companies and funders—and because it carried female connotations in a largely male industry.

“We danced around it,” she says, adding that they called themselves a “sentiment” company instead. “Investors invest in what they know, and we were so different from what they were used to.”

A decade later, that is changing. Though the field of artificial intelligence remains heavily male-dominated, female leaders have made noticeable inroads. Some say they want to build workplaces that are more inviting to diverse workforces, and

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women

‘Conservative Republican women are alive and well’: House GOP moves to close gender gap

More than that, though, the GOP — which has long shunned identity politics, at least when it comes to gender — has experienced a real attitude and cultural shift around electing more women to Congress, according to interviews with over a dozen lawmakers, candidates, operatives and aides. Women are stepping up to run, citing their gender as an asset and answering the siren sounded by party leaders — even as President Donald Trump remains divisive among women of both parties.

“The 2018 cycle was a motivating factor,” said retiring Rep. Susan Brooks (Ind.), one of just 13 Republican women in the House and head of recruitment efforts for the party’s campaign arm. “Even though we had been recruiting and helping women candidates, we realized we did need to shift some strategy and do far more.”

And so far, the initiative has paid off: 227 Republican women filed to run for

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