shopping

Can Microsoft’s Bing-Edge shopping tools make a dent in Google’s search monopoly?

Microsoft, the onetime monopolist, must find it hard to play the role of underdog. But that’s exactly where the company finds itself today when it comes to the highly non-competitive search market, where Google continues to lead and Microsoft is an extremely distant number two.

Google’s dominance also extends to the browser category, where Microsoft Edge is far behind Chrome. It’s still too early to tell whether Microsoft’s all-new Edge browser, based on Google’s open source Chromium code base, can make a dent in Google’s overwhelming lead on desktop PCs.

Ironically, Microsoft’s latest strategy for winning people over to Bing and Edge involves the same sort of tactic that got them in trouble in the 1990s: tying its search engine and its browser tightly to Windows. The difference in 2020 is that Windows no longer has monopoly power in a world dominated by mobile devices.

That background helps put today’s

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beauty

The beauty and the shame of Google’s Pixel 5 gamble

What is a “Google phone”? That’s a question I’ve been trying to wrap my moist mammal-brain around for many a moon now, and the answer has rarely stayed still for long.

Early on, back when the “Google phone” concept first came around with the Nexus line of devices (pour one out, everyone), the idea was meant to represent a dramatic shakeup of the phone-buying experience. The first Nexus phone, the now-classic Nexus One, had not only high-end hardware (for the time) but also a wild-seeming web-based sales model where you’d buy the phone unlocked, direct from Google, and without any carrier involvement. (Things were pretty different back in the prehistoric time of 2010 — as this Nexus launch video will quickly remind you.)

The idea of the “Google phone” eventually evolved to mean a niche-level device for developers, enthusiasts, and other people in the know. For a while, it also

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model

Google’s Sundar Pichai says future of office is employee ‘on-sites’

  • Google CEO Sundar Pichai says the company is “reconfiguring” its offices amid a more permanent shift to working from home. 
  • Pichai discussed the future of work at Google during an interview for Time 100 last week. 
  • While he doesn’t see office work disappearing altogether, he described the office as a space for “on-sites” — presumably, days when employees, who work mostly from home, gather in the office. 
  • Pichai also said he made the decision to have employees work from home until next summer to boost productivity and give workers a sense of certainty during an uncertain time.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Google’s famous offices may look a bit different for employees once it’s safe for them to begin returning to work.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai said last week that the company was making changes to its physical spaces to better support employees in a future Pichai said

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