women

Kamala Harris and the stereotypes we place on Black women

When society responds to Black women’s presence, it tends to respond with discomfort, neglect, hostility, and expressions of danger. This public dismissal is consistent with the broad marginalization that Black women have encountered politically. In 1973 Dr. Mae King of Howard University called such marginalization “a policy of invisibility.” 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTwo ethics groups call on House to begin impeachment inquiry against Barr Trump relishes return to large rallies following COVID-19 diagnosis McGrath: McConnell ‘can’t get it done’ on COVID-19 relief MORE’s rhetoric toward Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisMcConnell challenger dodges court packing question The Hill’s Campaign Report: Barrett hearings take center stage | Trump returns to campaign trail The Hill’s 12:30 Report – Sponsored by Facebook – Sights and sounds as Amy Coney’s Barrett hearing begins MORE (D-Calif.) continues the legacy of public shaming and insulting Black women. Trump’s hostility towards high-profile

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beauty

Kimora Lee Simmons On Baby Phat Beauty, Voter Suppression, and Kamala Harris

When I hop on the phone with businesswoman and cultural icon Kimora Lee Simmons to discuss her new beauty line, she surprises me with the first question. “How do I say your last name?” she asks, before pronouncing it perfectly.

Simmons has done this for over 20 years: Make women of color feel seen and heard. Since Baby Phat’s launch in 1999, Simmons has celebrated diversity and body positivity, long before 15 percent pledges and black squares on Instagram.

Justyna Fijalska

DIVINE Shimmer Dreams Set

Her newest venture, Baby Phat Beauty, is an extension of the brand’s 2019 re-launch, but Simmons is no stranger to the beauty industry. “If people remember, we had a very big beauty business in fragrance—the Golden Goddess, Seductive Goddess, Fabulosity, Dare Me, Love Me. I also had KLS cosmetics,” she says. “It’s not something that we’re new to, and it just seemed like a great

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women

Kamala Harris on the debate stage: Sight of pride and hope for women of color

On Wednesday night, the American people heard a debate and not a shoutfest. Pundits called it a return to traditional debate, but for millions of women of color, it was anything but that. Sen. Kamala Harris, a Californian whose family story includes both Black and South Asian roots, took a place on a stage that had, until now, been reserved almost exclusively for white men.

We do not agree with everything that was said on Wednesday’s stage. Our own vision of justice, dignity, and equity may not align precisely with anyone on the national ticket. We cannot, however, allow these differences to obscure what should be celebrated, not just by South Asian and Black women, but by the entire country.

Regardless of one’s personal politics, South Asians took pride in seeing one of our own on a national ticket. When Harris shared her family’s migration story, we saw our own

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clothing

Second Chance Ministry: Wake County bus driver Odessa Harris runs clothing pantry that is in need of donations this fall and winter

WAKE COUNTY, N.C. (WTVD) — A Wake County clothing pantry is in need of donations.

Odessa Harris has been a bus driver in Wake Country for nearly a decade and a half.

Harris sees the needs of all of her students as they get on and off the school bus every day.

“I see a lot of them and they don’t have coats,” Harris said. “One of the students last winter, she got on the bus and I was like ‘Where is your coat at?’ and she said ‘I don’t have one.'”

For that student, Odessa says she went into her own closet to give her a coat.

“If I don’t have it, I go to the store and purchase one,” said Harris.

That’s not the first time or student Odessa has helped.

In 2015, Odessa felt a calling from the Lord– a clothing ministry which she named Second Chance

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women

Women’s groups band together to defend Kamala Harris

Anticipating that Harris will face even more vicious attacks due to the double-barreled biases that Black women experience known as misogynoir, women’s groups banded together this summer to bolster her. Combining their efforts and $10 million in digital advertising, four political action committees — BlackPAC, Planned Parenthood Votes, PACRONYM, and WOMEN VOTE!, an affiliate of Emily’s List — are amplifying positive Harris messaging in key battleground states.

“This level of collaboration is new,” said Adrianne Shropshire, executive director of BlackPAC. “These are the lessons from 2016, without a doubt.”

They have their work cut out for them.

President Donald Trump, known for belittling caricatures of his opponents, already has described Harris as “angry” and as a “madwoman” and called her primary debate performance “nasty,” the same term he memorably flung at Clinton in 2016.

In a phone interview on Thursday morning on the Fox Business Channel, the president called her

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women

Kamala Harris: The sexist history of calling women ‘unlikable’

To historians who study women in politics, it was obvious.

“Likability among male politicians is pretty exclusive,” said Claire Bond Potter, a professor of history at the New School and the author of a book on political engagement. “This is part of a bigger problem that women have — a permanent outsider status in politics. They are always in the process of gaining entry.”

One of the ways to deny women entry is to deny anyone would want to be around them in the first place. The suffragists felt this wrath. So did Hillary Clinton. And now Harris is, too.

The code words are everywhere.

“One of the things that a man has to do to become likable is to be perceived as the kind of guy you want to have a beer with,” Potter said, referring to a phrase that was often used to describe Bill Clinton, George W.

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women

Harris showed Black women how to be ‘angry’ and handle a condescending white man

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris gestures toward Vice President Mike Pence during the debate in Salt Lake City on Wednesday. <span class="copyright">(AFP via Getty Images)</span>
Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris gestures toward Vice President Mike Pence during the debate in Salt Lake City on Wednesday. (AFP via Getty Images)

So I was wrong.

Up until the start of Wednesday’s vice presidential debate, I had been worried that Kamala Harris would fall victim to Mike Pence’s Midwestern nice schtick, honed during his time as governor of Indiana.

That if the California senator came after him like the hard-charging former prosecutor that she is, Pence would just shake his head and smile that smarmy smile, making Harris look like an angry Black woman and himself the picture of calm and civility.

But then it happened.

With just one exchange, Harris out-Midwestern-niced the Midwestern nice master, exposing Pence for the overconfident, condescending, weak and scared white man that he really is.

And even more importantly, she put a different kind of dent in the glass ceiling. Using

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women

Kamala Harris walked a fine line familiar to many women of color during the debate

In a vice presidential debate marked by at least some adherence to the rules, Sen. Kamala Harris found it necessary to ask Vice President Mike Pence not to interrupt her multiple times. She reminded him — sometimes with a hand up, crossing guard-style, other times with raised eyebrows — “Mr. Vice President, I’m speaking.”

At other moments as Pence spoke, Harris’ face flashed a catalogue of looks in his direction that seemed to communicate irritation, disbelief and distaste all at once, the kind of repertoire developed when one often cannot say everything one thinks.

Throughout, Harris worked to claim, then hold, new ground.

Harris, the first woman to serve as California’s attorney general, is the first woman of color to run on a major party’s presidential ticket and therefore the first to appear in a vice presidential debate. She arrived Wednesday with a complex set of challenges, expectations and demands.

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women

Kamala Harris ‘Nude’ Google Searches After Debate Speak Volumes About Women in Politics

The vice presidential debate on Wednesday was followed by a spike in people searching Google for Senator Kamala Harris, alongside the terms “nude,” “bathing suit,” and “bikini.”

With less than a month to go until the presidential election on November 3, Harris debated Vice President Mike Pence for 90 minutes at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City on Wednesday.

According to Google Trends—a website run by the search engine that collects data on how popular search terms are around the world—there was a surge in people in the U.S. searching for “Kamala Harris bathing suit,” “Kamala Harris Nude,” and “Kamala Harris bikini” in the hours after the pair faced off.

Google Trends listed these as “rising related queries” for the search term “Kamala Harris” in the four hours pior to 7 a.m. ET. That means in the four hours before 7 a.m. ET, people

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women

Harris Scores Points With Women; Fly Lands On Pence’s Head

KEY POINTS

  • Kamala Harris criticized Trump administration’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic
  • She was interrupted by Mike Pence while she was speaking
  • The senator shot down Pence’s intrusion in a clip that soon went viral
  • Another incident that created quite a buzz on social media was a fly landing on Pence’s head

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., hit back at Vice President Mike Pence after he interrupted her as she criticized the Trump administration’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic during Wednesday night’s vice presidential debate.

Harris said President Donald Trump attempted to downplay the threat of COVID-19 despite being aware of the severity of it just because he “wanted people to remain calm.” She then criticized the vice president for defending Trump even after knowing “how serious this was.” 

When Pence attempted to interrupt Harris, she cut him off saying, “Mr. Vice President, I’m speaking.” She then looked into the camera

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