women

Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court hearings divide Catholic women

“I seriously so admire her story” she texted her friend, a fellow Catholic woman, as she watched the Supreme Court nominee’s confirmation hearings this week.

Still, Lynch was bothered by the way the judge’s story was being used by politicians. She felt President Trump was exploiting the nomination to try to win over Catholic suburban women like her, she said. And she was frustrated that senators continued to bring up Barrett’s large family.

“You just know that if it was a father of 7 up for nomination,” Lynch texted her friend, “they wouldn’t be doing that.”

As Catholic women watched the first two days of Barrett’s confirmation process in the Senate, some saw her as a new kind of “feminist icon,” a woman who raised seven children while pursuing a successful career and prioritizing her faith. Others saw an unrealistic model of what Catholic women are expected to be.

“She’s

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women

Women in ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ habits protest ahead of Barrett confirmation hearings

Demonstrators attired in “Handmaid’s Tale” garbs on Monday gathered outside the U.S. Supreme Court to voice their opposition to the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

The striking red robes reference the clothing women are forced to wear in the fictional novel “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood in which an extremist Christian sect overthrows the U.S. government and strips women of nearly all their rights.

The outfit was similarly worn by demonstrators who protested during the confirmation hearings of Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughConservative group launches .3 million ad buy to boost Barrett SCOTUS nomination Cruz says he raised concerns with Trump over Gorsuch and Kavanaugh before nominations GOP vows quick confirmation of Trump’s Supreme Court pick amid coronavirus turmoil MORE.

Those who oppose the nomination of Barrett fear that she will support the reversal of the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that made abortion legal nationwide.

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women

Women in Handmaid’s Tale habits protest ahead of Barrett confirmation hearings

Demonstrators attired in Handmaid’s Tale garbs on Monday gathered outside the U.S. Supreme Court to voice their opposition to the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett.



a group of people wearing costumes: Women in Handmaid's Tale habits protest ahead of Barrett confirmation hearings


© The Hill
Women in Handmaid’s Tale habits protest ahead of Barrett confirmation hearings

The striking red robes reference the clothing women are forced to wear in the fictional novel “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood in which an extremist Christian sect overthrows the U.S. government and strip women of nearly all their rights.

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The outfit was similarly worn by demonstrators who protested during the confirmation hearing of Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Those who oppose the nomination of Barrett fear that she will support the reversal of the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that made abortion legal nationwide. Barrett has been critical of the ruling in the past. Many have also expressed concern that Judge Barrett will work to take down the Affordable

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model

Senators have an opportunity to model religious tolerance in the Amy Coney Barrett hearings. Will they?

I’ve never met Amy Coney Barrett, and I’m not a legal scholar with informed opinions on her past judicial rulings. But I find myself sympathizing with her as she prepares to enter the lion’s den of Supreme Court confirmation hearings.

Because like Barrett, but on a smaller stage, I know what it’s like to juggle a high-profile career, in a flyover state, while raising small children and practicing my faith, a kind of faith that many of my colleagues thought disqualified me from doing good work.

When I read that at a 2017 court of appeals confirmation hearing, Sen. Dianne Feinstein told Judge Barrett, “the dogma lives loudly within you” — implying that the judge would impose her conservative Catholic faith on Americans — I flashed back to a standoff with colleagues early in my broadcast journalism career.

It was shortly after I’d been assigned to the religion and culture

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