clothing

How DTC Brand Cuts Clothing Became the Breakout Hit for Players in the NBA ‘Bubble’

For Cuts Clothing—a maker of T-shirts, polos and sweatshirts—the bubble created by the National Basketball Association in Orlando for the league’s playoffs proved to be the ideal environment for the brand to spread the gospel about the quality of its clothing.

Heading into the tournament, the likes of Pat Connaughton of the Milwaukee Bucks and C.J. McCollum of the Portland Trailblazers were already fans of the direct-to-consumer retailer, according to Steven Borrelli, the founder and CEO of Cuts.

“It really just blossomed from those initial guys,” Borrelli said. “The nature of it, where they are not at home and they don’t have their full closets, Cuts became a real necessity more than just a want. And we were [able] to execute on that for them.”

By the time the L.A. Lakers were crowned champions, dozens of players were wearing and being photographed in Cuts’ signature shirts and face masks, Borrelli

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women

In Former Taliban Stronghold, Defiant Women Hit the Gym

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — Homa Yusafzai felt terrible. Her weight was up, she had diabetes and high blood pressure, and at just 27 she felt lethargic and depressed.

Then she heard that Kandahar’s first health club for women had just opened — the miracle she had been waiting for, she thought. Her husband at first refused to let her join. Kandahar is a deeply conservative city, a former headquarters of the Taliban where men still dictate the most prosaic details of women’s lives.

But ultimately, he relented, and Ms. Yusafzai now works out six days a week, straining through hand-weight repetitions and pounding a treadmill. In six months, she said, she had shed almost 50 pounds, lowered her blood pressure and brought her diabetes under control.

“I feel so healthy and I have more energy — I’m so happy,” she said as she rested between workouts.

The health club was opened

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shopping

Amazon Prime Day Kicks-Off Holiday Shopping Projected To Hit $9.9 Billion

Holiday 2020 will be an extended shopping season starting with Amazon’s
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Prime Day on October 13th and 14th. Many other retailers will be following suit to compete for the customer’s dollars over the two-day period. Last year Amazon Prime Day raked in $6.93 billion worldwide from 124 million U.S. Prime users (up almost 11% from the previous year). For 2020, the projections are sales of $9.91 billion worldwide from more than 142 million U.S. users, surpassing 50% of the US population.

Andrew Lipsman, principal analyst of eMarketer, said in an interview,” Prime Day is a coordinated industry-wide event with other retailers planning promotions to compete with Amazon for shoppers’ attention.” The value of each shopping

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women

Pregnancy rates hit new lows for women 24 and younger, new highs for women 35 and older: study

Pregnancy rates among women aged 24 or younger hit record lows in 2016, while rates for women aged 35 and older reached new highs, according to a new analysis published Thursday by Guttmacher, a sexual and reproductive health research organization.

Meanwhile, abortion rates have also declined for young people over the past 25 years, partially due to a decline in the number of people in that age group who became pregnant.

“Pregnancy rates for young people have reached their lowest recorded levels, and both birth and abortion rates among young people are continuing a longstanding decline over the past two-and-a-half decades,” said Guttmacher Senior Research Associate Isaac Maddow-Zimet.

“Conversely, pregnancy rates among older age groups have reached historic highs, with abortion rates remaining fairly constant.”

Guttmacher’s count of pregnancies includes ones that end in births, abortions, miscarriages and stillbirths.

In 2016, the latest year for which comprehensive data is available,

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jewelry

‘Zoom-worthy’ pieces like earrings and necklaces are selling though jewelry is expected to take a COVID-19 hit in 2020


Getty Images

People who are working from home are still getting dressed up from the neck up for videoconference meetings, and Signet Jewelers Ltd. Chief Executive Virginia Drosos says earrings and pendants are selling as a result. But the jewelry category is expected to take a hit in 2020 due to COVID-19.

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Drosos told MarketWatch that “Zoom-worthy jewelry” and bridal pieces like engagement rings continue attract consumers during the pandemic.

“Consumers are buying jewelry that represents the times,” Drosos said, highlighting things that are top-of-mind for consumers these days like good health and strong relationships. “We aren’t celebrating by going out to dinner or on a big vacation so buying something that memorializes where we are is important to people.”

Many shoppers, even those buying jewelry, are heading to e-commerce sites to make a purchase or do research. “Jewelry is a category that has moved slowly to

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jewelry

‘Zoom-worthy’ pieces are selling though jewelry expected to take a COVID-19 hit

People who are working from home are still getting dressed up from the neck up for videoconference meetings, and Signet Jewelers Ltd. Chief Executive Virginia Drosos says earrings and pendants are selling as a result. But the jewelry category is expected to take a hit in 2020 due to COVID-19.

Drosos told MarketWatch that “Zoom-worthy jewelry” and bridal pieces like engagement rings continue attract consumers during the pandemic.

“Consumers are buying jewelry that represents the times,” Drosos said, highlighting things that are top-of-mind for consumers these days like good health and strong relationships. “We aren’t celebrating by going out to dinner or on a big vacation so buying something that memorializes where we are is important to people.”

Many shoppers, even those buying jewelry, are heading to e-commerce sites to make a purchase or do research. “Jewelry is a category that has moved slowly to online,” Drosos said.

Watch: Why

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jewelry

‘Zoom-worthy’ pieces like earrings and necklaces are selling though jewelry is expected to take a COVID-19 hit in 2020

Tonya Garcia

People who are working from home are still getting dressed up from the neck up for videoconference meetings, and Signet Jewelers Ltd. Chief Executive Virginia Drosos says earrings and pendants are selling as a result. But the jewelry category is expected to take a hit in 2020 due to COVID-19.

Drosos told MarketWatch that “Zoom-worthy jewelry” and bridal pieces like engagement rings continue attract consumers during the pandemic.

“Consumers are buying jewelry that represents the times,” Drosos said, highlighting things that are top-of-mind for consumers these days like good health and strong relationships. “We aren’t celebrating by going out to dinner or on a big vacation so buying something that memorializes where we are is important to people.”

Many shoppers, even those buying jewelry, are heading to e-commerce sites (link)to make a purchase or do research. “Jewelry is a category that has moved slowly to online,” Drosos said.

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women

U.S. labor shock from pandemic hit women of color hardest; will it persist?

By Howard Schneider

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – One of the positive turns that the U.S. economy took during a decade-long recovery through 2019 was a steady rise in the share of women looking for work and working.

Women’s labor force participation had declined in 2007-2009 during the Great Recession, and many economists had worried that would become permanent, weighing on growth overall as women kept their skills and efforts off the table.

When women’s participation started climbing around 2015, particularly for Blacks and Latinas, it helped boost growth and likely was a force behind the increases in household income that also began around then.

(Graphic: Labor force participation among women – https://graphics.reuters.com/GREAT-REBOOT/DATA/gjnpwjowbvw/chart.png)

The coronavirus has seized back those gains, and sparked another debate over whether reduced participation will persist.

(Graphic: Women’s labor force participation, post pandemic – https://graphics.reuters.com/GREAT-REBOOT/DATA/xlbpgjxoxvq/chart.png)

Recessions typically fall hardest on racial and ethnic minorities, due to bias as

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beauty

Justin Simien’s Sundance Horror Hit Satirizes Racist Beauty Norms



a close up of Elle Johnson


© Hulu


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Just in time for Halloween month, Hulu has released the first official trailer for its alluring horror satire “Bad Hair,” the second feature film from “Dear White People” creator Justin Simien. Simien’s debut feature was released in 2014, which led to the eponymous hit Netflix series, set to release its fourth and final season later this year. Though the popular show will be bowing out, clearly Simien isn’t slowing down anytime soon. After a successful premiere at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, “Bad Hair” will be released on Hulu later this month. From the looks of this trailer, it’s sure to be a hit.

Per Hulu’s official synopsis: “In this horror satire set in 1989, Bad Hair follows an ambitious young woman (Elle Lorraine) who gets a weave in order to succeed in the image-obsessed world of music television. However,

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women

Older women and disabled people hardest hit by Australia’s assault on welfare



a group of people in front of a sign: Photograph: Stefan Postles/AAP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Stefan Postles/AAP

Two decades of welfare crackdowns by successive governments have resulted in a sharp rise in older women and people with disabilities languishing on unemployment benefits for longer.

A Parliamentary Budget Office paper issued on Wednesday reveals that, as of 2019, 62% of men receiving jobseeker payment are staying on the benefit longer than 12 months – up from 51% in 2007.

But the change is even more drastic among women, rising from 47.6% to 71.2%.

The analysis – which tracks the impact of big shifts in welfare policy dating back as far as the Howard years – confirms warnings from advocates and analysis by Guardian Australia that the unemployed are spending longer on benefits than ever before.



a group of people in front of a sign: Researchers argue unemployment benefits now appear to ‘function as a kind of pre-age-pension payment for some older Australians’.


© Photograph: Stefan Postles/AAP
Researchers argue unemployment benefits now appear to ‘function as a kind of pre-age-pension payment for some older Australians’.

In 2007, 9.5%

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