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Meghan Duggan, a champion across women’s hockey, retires

In the midst of the U.S. women’s hockey national team fighting for better wages and equitable support, Meghan Duggan got on the phone with every player to explain what it was all about.

With the world championships on home ice weeks away and the stakes high, Duggan thought it was her duty as captain.

“When you think of a captain on your team and a leader on your team, you want someone that’s willing to do things that no one else is willing to do,” teammate Monique Lamoureux-Morando recalled.

Duggan did that on and off the ice, leading the U.S. to the 2018 Olympic gold medal and spearheading the wage boycott. A year earlier, that fight led to a new contract and a brighter spotlight on the sport.

“We were able to work through that and move through things together and be on the right side of history,” Duggan said

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Hockey star won three “olympic medals with USA

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United States forward Meghan Duggan shares Team USA’s secret to success and how good it felt to win against rival Canada.

After a 14-year career with the U.S. women’s national hockey team, captain Meghan Duggan announced her retirement on Tuesday.

Duggan, 33, who captained three Olympic teams, won silver in 2010 and 2014 before the team clinched its first Olympic gold in over two decades at the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. 

Duggan played Division I hockey for the Wisconsin Badgers from 2006 to 2009, where she totaled 69 goals and 82 assists in 118 games.

“I certainly feel at peace with my decision,” Duggan said in a Zoom call with reporters. “Today is an exciting day to celebrate with my family and my teammates and so many people that have been in my life to get to this point. 

“But it’s certainly an emotional one as well. It was

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women

Meghan Duggan, captain of the Olympic-winning US women’s hockey team, will retire

Meghan Duggan, a captain on the US women’s hockey team that captured gold in the 2018 Olympics, is retiring.



a person wearing a helmet: USA's Meghan Duggan looks on in the women's preliminary round ice hockey match between the US and Canada during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Kwandong Hockey Centre in Gangneung on February 15, 2018.  / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski    (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)


© BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images
USA’s Meghan Duggan looks on in the women’s preliminary round ice hockey match between the US and Canada during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Kwandong Hockey Centre in Gangneung on February 15, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Duggan spent 14 years with the national team, and made the announcement Tuesday in an essay shared with ESPN.

“Although being an athlete will always be part of my identity, I am ready for the next chapter. I know it’s the right decision for me, but at the same time, it’s still very emotional,” Duggan said in the essay.

Duggan played in 137 games for the US national team, lighting the lamp with 40 goals and dishing out

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women

Meghan Duggan, United States women’s hockey team captain, announces retirement

meghan-duggan.jpg
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United States women’s hockey star Meghan Duggan announced her retirement Tuesday in an essay that was published on ESPN. Duggan, 33, was the captain of the United States squad that won a gold medal at the 2018 Olympics — the country’s first gold medal in two decades. The Wisconsin graduate is the only man or woman to captain both a gold-medal winning Olympic hockey team and an NCAA championship team.

“Hockey literally changed my life,” Duggan wrote. “I put on a pair of skates as a toddler and grew up through the sport. It’s been one of the greatest privileges of my life to play for Team USA. While being an athlete will always be part of my identity, I am ready for the next chapter.”

Duggan was a star on the ice. She debuted with the national team in 2007at 19, when she was a freshman at

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women

Meghan Duggan, a champion across women’s hockey, retires

In the midst of the U.S. women’s hockey national team fighting for better wages and equitable support, Meghan Duggan got on the phone with every player to explain what it was all about.

With the world championships on home ice weeks away and the stakes high, Duggan felt it was her duty as captain.

“When you think of a captain on your team and a leader on your team, you want someone that’s willing to do things that no one else is willing to do,” teammate Monique Lamoureux-Morando recalled.

Duggan did that on and off the ice, leading the U.S. to the 2018 Olympic gold medal and spearheading the wage boycott. A year earlier that led to a new contract and a brighter spotlight on the sport.

She announced her retirement Tuesday after 11 years with the national team. She was the first American men’s or women’s player to win

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women

United States women’s hockey captain Meghan Duggan retiring

Meghan Duggan, captain of the U.S. women’s hockey team that won Olympic gold in 2018, is retiring.

Duggan, who had a 14-year stint with the national team, announced her retirement in an essay published Tuesday by ESPN.

“Hockey literally changed my life,” Duggan wrote. “I put on a pair of skates as a toddler and grew up through the sport. It’s been one of the greatest privileges of my life to play for Team USA. While being an athlete will always be part of my identity, I am ready for the next chapter.”

Duggan, 33, played in 137 games for the U.S. women’s national team, scoring 40 goals and 35 assists. She won seven gold medals at the IIHF world championships and was part of three Olympic teams — winning silver in 2010 and 2014 and taking home gold in 2018 — the American women’s first Olympic gold in 20

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National Women’s Hockey League founder Dani Rylan Kearney stepping down as commissioner

National Women’s Hockey League founder Dani Rylan Kearney is stepping down as commissioner as part of a restructuring of the league’s governing model, the Associated Press reported.

According to the AP, Rylan Kearney will remain involved as president of an ownership group that controls four of the NWHL’s six teams, and Tyler Tumminia will be appointed interim commissioner.

The league was scheduled to announce the moves on Tuesday.

The restructuring is a result of the NWHL’s forming an incorporated association that will be overseen by a board of governors, with one representative per team. This is a departure from the past, when the NWHL oversaw control of all teams.

Tumminia joined the NWHL as chairman of the league’s Toronto Six expansion team, which was founded in April. The Six and the NWHL’s Boston Pride are operated by independent ownership groups.

Rylan Kearney will oversee the league’s four remaining teams, which

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Kings’ Quinton Byfield wants to be a role model for other Black hockey players

Canada's Quinton Byfield, left, tries to get past Jordan Harris of the U.S. during the world junior championships on Dec. 26. <span class="copyright">(Petr David Josek / Associated Press)</span>
Canada’s Quinton Byfield, left, tries to get past Jordan Harris of the U.S. during the world junior championships on Dec. 26. (Petr David Josek / Associated Press)

Quinton Byfield fell in love with hockey the way most Canadian kids do — sitting in front of the TV with his dad, Clinton, on Saturday nights and flicking on that week’s “Hockey Night in Canada” game.

Only, in Byfield’s case, his dad never played the game. For a long time, Clinton knew little about the sport they were watching.

Unlike most other Canadian kids, Byfield’s father isn’t from hockey’s homeland. Clinton is a Jamaican immigrant. So when he and his wife, Nicole Kasper, raised their family outside Toronto, the national sport wasn’t so much passed down to their son — it was picked up by the household … together.

“Those are big moments, just being able to share that,” Byfield said. “They

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