jewelry

India’s Tanishq jewelry pulls interfaith ad amid Hindu outrage

But just days after the ad aired, Tanishq, the jewelry company, pulled it from all platforms following a flood of angry calls from Hindu nationalists on social media to boycott the brand, including by members of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party or the BJP.

Kothapalli Geetha, a former legislator of the BJP called the ad “highly objectionable” for “normalizing love jihad.” Love jihad is a conspiracy theory espoused by right-wing Hindu activists that Muslim men are engaged in a deliberate effort to convert Hindu girls through marriage. A law enforcement probe in 2018 into 11 interfaith marriages found no evidence of coercion.

A prominent right wing lawyer also shared the details of a Muslim employee of the company on Twitter, a move known as doxing, calling on his followers to “expose” Tanishq and make them apologize.

It is the latest instance of the bitter religious divide sweeping India

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jewelry

India’s Tanishq pulls jewelry commercial featuring interfaith couple after backlash

The 45-second advertisement for the “Ekatvam (Unity) — the beauty of oneness” collection showed a Muslim family throwing a traditionally South Indian Hindu baby shower for their pregnant Hindu daughter-in-law.

The daughter-in-law says, “But these rituals aren’t celebrated in your home,” and the mother-in-law replies, “But the ritual of making daughters happy is in every home.”

The hashtag “BoycottTanishq” began trending in India after the Tata Group jewelry brand posted the ad at the weekend.

Tanishq removed the commercial from all platforms Monday, later telling CNN that the film had sparked “divergent and severe reactions, contrary to its very objective.”

Some people on social media called for Tanishq to apologize for running the commercial.

Several called the ad “Love Jihad” — a reference to an Islamophobic theory that claims that Muslim families try to convert Hindu women to Islam under the pretext of love and marriage.

“This advert is wrong
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women

Trio of Women Lawyers Push for Change to India’s Creaking Courts

(Bloomberg) — The three lawyers who resolved India’s largest bankruptcy case last year are using their elevated professional standing to address a different problem: not enough women in the bar.

The protracted legal tangle between Essar Steel India Ltd. and ArcelorMittal, laid to rest last year, was India’s largest bankruptcy case by the amount of debt owed and recovered — a whopping $5.6 billion. Acting for the lenders was Misha, who goes by one name. Ruby Ahuja drove ArcelorMittal to acquire the bankrupt steel mill, and Shally Bhasin represented some vendors and creditors seeking dues from Essar Steel.



a person wearing a blue shirt: Women Lead Court Battles in India’s $190 Billion War on Bad Loan


© Bloomberg
Women Lead Court Battles in India’s $190 Billion War on Bad Loan

Misha

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Photographer: Ruhani Kaur/Bloomberg

The landmark final ruling ended tycoon Lakshmi Mittal’s long wait to enter the world’s second-biggest steel market. It also empowered Indian banks with the legal authority to set the terms of the

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women

Like US Supreme Court, few women in India’s courts, bar council



a group of people standing in front of a building


© Provided by Quartz


It is 2020, and India has never seen a woman become chief justice.

This fact is only more poignant in the light of US Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death on Sept. 18. As the second female justice in the highest US court, her life and work have been inspirational to countless women in the country and elsewhere. In India, though, the idea of a gender-balanced judiciary is far from becoming reality.

Not only has no woman ever been chief justice of the Indian supreme court, the representation of women across different courts and judicial bodies is also abysmally low, according to data collected by Smashboard, a New Delhi- and Paris-based non-profit that focuses on fighting sexism.

These are by no means the first voices to be raised against rampant sexism in Indian courts.

Sexism through the ranks

In March 2019, attorney general

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