women

Women outwit Hollywood bias with help from industry insiders

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Kaitlyn Yang knows it’s rare for women to work in visual effects but wanted to find out just how much company she has.



In this image provided by the Television Academy, Layne Eskridge, creative executive at Apple TV, center, takes part in "Meet Our Alumni: Intern to Industry Professional," one of the Television Academy Foundation's intern Speaker Series events on Aug. 2, 2018, in Los Angeles. Women of color who work behind the camera in fields including writing and visual effects are finding career support, including from the Television Academy Foundation and its internships. But four former interns say the industry must do more to foster diversity. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision for the Television Academy/AP Images via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
In this image provided by the Television Academy, Layne Eskridge, creative executive at Apple TV, center, takes part in “Meet Our Alumni: Intern to Industry Professional,” one of the Television Academy Foundation’s intern Speaker Series events on Aug. 2, 2018, in Los Angeles. Women of color who work behind the camera in fields including writing and visual effects are finding career support, including from the Television Academy Foundation and its internships. But four former interns say the industry must do more to foster diversity. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision for the Television Academy/AP Images via AP)

Devising an informal survey earlier this year, she painstakingly searched 24,000 LinkedIn entries for female visual effects supervisors in North America. Her tally:

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