style

China Bringing Xinjiang-Style Forced Labor Camps to Tibet, Report Says

In what appears to replicate what’s happening in China’s Xinjiang region to Uighur Muslims, a new report from the Jamestown Foundation, corroborated by Reuters, details evidence of a vast program in a remote region of Tibet aimed at promoting Chinese national unity and patriotism, instilling “work discipline,” and eradicating what the Chinese Communist Party refers to as “backward thinking” by the Tibetan people. 

According to evidence uncovered by researcher Adrian Zenz of the Jamestown Foundation, a U.S.-based think tank, China relocated more than 500,000 “rural surplus workers” in Tibet in the first seven months of 2020 into military-style facilities and “re-education centers” to train them as factory workers for areas of the country in need of manufacturing output. 

China has defended the program as part of its ambitious poverty alleviation plan under President Xi Jinping, but documents examined by Zenz as part of his research reveal parallels to the detention

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women

U.S. labor shock from pandemic hit women of color hardest; will it persist?

By Howard Schneider

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – One of the positive turns that the U.S. economy took during a decade-long recovery through 2019 was a steady rise in the share of women looking for work and working.

Women’s labor force participation had declined in 2007-2009 during the Great Recession, and many economists had worried that would become permanent, weighing on growth overall as women kept their skills and efforts off the table.

When women’s participation started climbing around 2015, particularly for Blacks and Latinas, it helped boost growth and likely was a force behind the increases in household income that also began around then.

(Graphic: Labor force participation among women – https://graphics.reuters.com/GREAT-REBOOT/DATA/gjnpwjowbvw/chart.png)

The coronavirus has seized back those gains, and sparked another debate over whether reduced participation will persist.

(Graphic: Women’s labor force participation, post pandemic – https://graphics.reuters.com/GREAT-REBOOT/DATA/xlbpgjxoxvq/chart.png)

Recessions typically fall hardest on racial and ethnic minorities, due to bias as

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women

865,000 women dropped out of the labor force in September 2020

As the economy slowly tries to recover during the coronavirus pandemic, new data shows that women are still being disproportionately impacted by today’s crisis. 

Between August and September, nearly 1.1 million workers ages 20 and over dropped out of the labor force, meaning they are no longer working or looking for work. Of those workers, 865,000 of them were women, a number that is four times higher than the 216,000 men who also left the workforce, according to a National Women’s Law Center analysis.

“This is the devastating impact of the ongoing breakdown of our nation’s caregiving infrastructure in the face of Covid-19,” Emily Martin, vice president for education and workplace justice at NWLC, tells CNBC Make It. “As families across the country struggle to figure out how to keep their jobs while also making sure their children are cared for, safe and learning every day, it’s women who are

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model

Author Michael Lind: US needs ‘new model’ for organized labor

Author Michael Lind called for a “new model” for organized labor in America, noting that most countries operate under a system where collective bargaining benefits entire economic sectors.

“Unions are important because in practice, wages are set by bargaining power, not merely by market forces,” Lind said in a Monday HillTV interview. “Employers do have some wiggle room in setting wages and they will set them as low as possible unless individual workers can pool their bargaining power through collective bargaining power somehow.”

Lind noted that most countries operate under so-called sectoral bargaining, in which employers and labor reach an agreement that covers all workers in a specific sector of the economy. He called this system “better both for workers and for business than the enterprise-based system of unionism that the United States has had since the 1930s.”

Lind faulted this American system for the collapse of American union membership

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