style

Black man who was led by mounted police using a rope sues over ‘slave’-style arrest

The Black man’s hands were cuffed behind his back as two white police officers on horseback steered him through the streets of Galveston, Texas. The mounted officers used a long blue rope to guide the man several blocks under the glare of the summer sun.

Footage of Donald Neely’s August 2019 arrest triggered a national outcry, with the scene drawing comparisons to the inhumane treatment of enslaved people in the 1800s.

According to Neely’s lawsuit, the way he was arrested made him feel “as though he was a slave.” The lawsuit, filed against the city and its police force last week, alleges that Neely’s arrest on suspicion of criminal trespassing was “extreme and outrageous.”

The police chief apologized, and the charges have been dropped, according to Neely’s attorney, Julie Ketterman. But Neely is now seeking up to $1 million in damages for emotional distress, malicious prosecution, and negligence after suffering

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style

Galveston police sued by Donald Neely, Black man who was led by rope by officers on horses

According to his new lawsuit, Neely said the way he was arrested made him feel “as though he was a slave.” The lawsuit, filed against the city and its police force last week, alleges that Neely’s arrest on suspicion of criminal trespassing was “extreme and outrageous.”

The police chief apologized, and the charges have been dropped, according to Neely’s attorney, Julie Ketterman. But Neely is now seeking up to $1 million in damages for emotional distress, malicious prosecution, and negligence after suffering both mental and physical anguish by those who had a duty to protect him, the attorney said.

The lawsuit alleges that he suffered physical and emotional pain, including handcuff abrasions, as he was led on foot to a mounted-officer staging area because no vehicles were immediately available to transport him.

The Galveston Police Department said it would not comment on an active lawsuit.

Neely, who has long experienced

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women

In Belarus, Women Led the Protests and Shattered Stereotypes

MINSK, Belarus — With masked riot police officers massing nearby, threatening to attack protesters like him with batons and fists, Aleksei D. Zulevsky felt safe for the first time in weeks of anti-government unrest in Belarus: He was surrounded by hundreds of women he knew would shield him.

“I feel protected here,” said Mr. Zulevsky, as fellow protesters, many holding red and white flags, the banner of the opposition, chanted at a rally last month. “Only cowards beat women!”

In a country whose strongman president, Aleksandr. G Lukashenko, has openly scoffed at women as too weak for politics and told them their place was in the kitchen, Belarusian women have become the face and driving force of a movement aimed at toppling a leader known as “Europe’s last dictator.”

That effort may be flagging, with Mr. Lukashenko refusing to give up power even though tens of thousands of people continue

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accesories

Best smart lights for 2020 (LED bulbs, switches, light strips, accessories and more)

Smart home gadgets are just about everywhere these days, and smart lights that you can control and automate — with voice commands or from a smartphone, tablet or other smart device — are one of the easiest ways to jump on the bandwagon. If you’re looking to try them out and leave your old lights behind, you’ll more options than ever as you shop. Even better: The uptick in competition means there are lots of affordable options to choose from, too.

philips-wiz-connected-smart-wi-fi-led

This color-changing Philips Wiz Connected LED works with Alexa and Google, and costs just $13.


Ry Crist/CNET

How affordable? You can build an entire smart lighting system with dirt-cheap white light smart bulbs that cost less than $10, color-changing bulbs for less than $15 a piece, solar-powered outdoor smart lights for as low as $35 a pop, plus dimmable smart light switches and nifty new lighting accessories for

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accesories

Best smart lights in 2020 (LED bulbs, switches, light strips, accessories and more)

Smart home gadgets are everywhere these days, and smart lights that you can control and automate — with voice commands or from a smartphone, tablet or other smart device — are one of the easiest ways to jump on the bandwagon. If you’re looking to try them out and leave your old lights behind, you’ll more options than ever as you shop. Even better: The uptick in competition means there are lots of affordable options to choose from, too.

philips-wiz-connected-smart-wi-fi-led

This color-changing Philips Wiz Connected LED works with Alexa and Google, and costs just $13.


Ry Crist/CNET

How affordable? You can build an entire smart lighting system with dirt-cheap white light smart bulbs that cost less than $10, color-changing bulbs for less than $15 a piece, solar-powered outdoor smart lights for as low as $35 a pop, plus dimmable smart light switches and nifty new lighting accessories for less than

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clothing

FACEism: How a simple clothing item led to the first hate-crime fatality after 9/11

PHOENIX — The American Dream is simple: Work hard, love your country and anything is possible.

Balbir Singh Sodhi believed in that dream.

An immigrant from India, Balbir drove a cab in Los Angeles and saved up enough to buy a gas station in Arizona.

Then 9/11 happened.

Balbir, who was of the Sikh faith, wore a turban. He realized that his horrified fellow Americans were seeing an image on television of a man, Osama bin Laden, who was also wearing one.

Seeking to reassure the community that people who look like him are peaceful, Balbir planned to hold a press conference on Sunday, Sept. 16, 2001.

Instead, he ended up becoming the country’s first hate crime fatality after the 9/11 attacks.

In the fourth installment of the FACEism series, we examine Balbir’s life and tragic death and how we as a society are quick to judge a person by

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wedding

Pastor Who Led Maine Superspreader Wedding Must Wear Mask at Son’s Nuptials, N.H. Church Says

PBS Wedding chairs

The pastor who officiated the Maine wedding that turned into a COVID-19 superspreader event linked to at least eight deaths will be required to wear a mask when he is at his son’s nuptials at a New Hampshire church later this month, a church official said.

Rev. Todd Bell, a pastor at Calvary Baptist Church in Sanford, Maine, led the Aug. 7 wedding ceremony at a nearby church, and the 65 attendees were in violation of the state’s COVID-19 restrictions on crowd size and its mask mandate. The ceremony, along with the subsequent reception at Big Moose Inn, has now been linked to at least 180 infections and eight deaths, primarily in people at a nearby nursing home who did not attend the wedding.

Bell has ignored social distancing practices and Maine’s mask mandate at his church and encouraged his congregation to trust God rather than the

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women

How a lack of confidence among women led to the gender gap in tech

  • Matthew J. Liberatore and William Wagner are business professors who studied performance across men and women in mid-level jobs, and asked research subjects to rate how they thought they did. 
  • While there were only insignificant differences in performance, they found women were strikingly less confident in how they performed than men. 
  • It’s hard to know why this is the case, but studies suggest women tend to believe they’re less skilled at STEM-related tasks, including math and technology. 
  • Narrowing the gender gap is going to require more than simply promoting equality in the workforce — schools, universities, and companies need to start initiatives to boost confidence in young women to go into STEM fields. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

In the workplace, women are now as good as men when it comes to computing performance, but there is still a gender gap when it comes to confidence, according to

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model

‘Incorrect mental model’ led to Qantas 737 runway incursion | News

The captain of a Qantas Boeing 737-800 had developed an “incorrect mental model” of exit taxiways at Perth airport, believing that the aircraft would not need to cross an active runway after exiting the taxiway.

Even when he saw an illuminated stop bar, he believed it was installed incorrectly.

This led to a runway incursion, which saw the aircraft cross a designated stopping point and nearly entering the adjacent runway, where another Qantas 737 was about to commence its takeoff.

Runwayincursion_ATSB

Releasing its final report into the 2018 incident, investigators from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) also note that the two 737s came into extremely close contact after the departing 737 rejected takeoff — the latter’s wingtip was just 15m away from the nose of the other 737.

The incident took place on 28 April 2018, when a Qantas 737, registered VH-XZM, had landed at runway 03, after a flight

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fashion

How Black Led Fashion Organizations are Holding the Industry Accountable

Photo credit: Design by Ingrid Frahm
Photo credit: Design by Ingrid Frahm

From Harper’s BAZAAR

June 2 is a day that will live in Instagram history (or maybe infamy). Black tiles flooded Instagram feeds as part of #BlackoutTuesday, a social campaign to raise awareness for the Black Lives Matter movement. George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, had been killed by Minneapolis police just a week earlier, sparking protests across the nation and demands for change. Calls for an end to systemic racism, police brutality, and white supremacy were loud and righteous. So #BlackoutTuesday, a hashtag that was posted around 28 million times, went viral.

Many companies participated in #BlackoutTuesday, including countless fashion brands. However, the move struck many—particularly Black and Brown people who work within those companies—as performative. It felt disingenuous, especially coming from an industry so entrenched in systemic racism, like a moment of optical allyship that didn’t go far enough.

“We can’t just go

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