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Netflix’s Ted Sarandos on Expanding Animation, Global Vision

Ted Sarandos is not much for change, personally.

It’s a funny thing to say about the recently minted co-CEO of Netflix, one of the entertainment world’s biggest disruptors, but as he points out, he’s had only “two cars and one job over the past 20 years.”

“I am one of those folks who ends up doing things a long time, so I’m not one of these people who flips things easy,” he says with a laugh.

His previous car, which lasted 11 years, was an Acura MDX; he drove around a Ford Explorer for a decade before that. The job, of course, is at Netflix — the streaming giant that has shaken up how Hollywood does business and how the world consumes entertainment.

Even so, when Sarandos joined Netflix in 2000 as a DVD buyer, he didn’t quite think about whether he might someday wind up running the place alongside

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Netflix’s ‘The Haunting of Bly Manor’ Is Less Scary, More Satisfying : NPR

What’s creepier: The kid (Benjamin Evan Ainsworth) or the high-waisted jeans on the au pair (Victoria Pedretti)? The Haunting of Bly Manor makes a case for both.

Eike Schroter/Netflix


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Eike Schroter/Netflix

What’s creepier: The kid (Benjamin Evan Ainsworth) or the high-waisted jeans on the au pair (Victoria Pedretti)? The Haunting of Bly Manor makes a case for both.

Eike Schroter/Netflix

Netflix’s 2018 series The Haunting of Hill House was a gorgeous ghostly journey that arrived at a too-tidy destination. Based loosely on the Shirley Jackson novel, it chronicled the way violence leaves a hole in the world, and how trauma lingers, shaping memories and sundering families.

It uh … it was a lot more fun than that sounds, though.

Filled with strong performances and unsettling images both overt (every episode came factory-installed with a jump scare) and subtle (showrunner Mike Flanagan packed the shadows in many

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