women

Opinion | Megan Thee Stallion: Why I Speak Up for Black Women

Maternal mortality rates for Black mothers are about three times higher than those for white mothers, an obvious sign of racial bias in health care. In 2019, an astronomical 91 percent of the transgender or gender-nonconforming people who were fatally shot were Black, according to the Human Rights Campaign.

Beyond threats to our health and lives, we confront so much judgment and so many conflicting messages on a daily basis.

If we dress in fitted clothing, our curves become a topic of conversation not only on social media, but also in the workplace. The fact that Serena Williams, the greatest athlete in any sport ever, had to defend herself for wearing a bodysuit at the 2018 French Open is proof positive of how misguided the obsession with Black women’s bodies is.

I would know. I’ve received quite a bit of attention for appearance as well as my talent. I choose

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women

Opinion | France’s dress code debate shows how its society still policies women

The Sept. 14 movement, which was meant to confront these views, invited students in middle and high schools to attend classes on that day in “skirts, necklines and crop tops,” or in any outfit that would be labeled “provocative” or “obscene” according to schools’ internal regulations.

In response, French Minister of Education Jean-Michel Blanquer announced a peculiar clothing standard for female high school students, calling on them to dress “in a republican style.” He said that everything should “be all right” for girls as long as they “dress normally” — whatever that means. He later made his thoughts more explicit: “You don’t go to school as you would to the beach or a nightclub.”

Blanquer was mocked and criticized for his comments. People reminded him that Marianne, the fictitious woman who symbolizes the French Republic, is often represented with a bare breast. And Marlène Schiappa and Elisabeth Moreno, two female

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women

Opinion | Gina M. Raimondo, Mary Kay Henry: Women are bearing the brunt of the economic crisis. They have to lead our recovery plans.

Even before the pandemic exposed deep disparities in our economy and society, the gender wage gap persisted at every level of income and education. In 2019, two-thirds of minimum-wage workers were women. Women carry two-thirds of all student debt in the United States. Black women graduate with significantly more debt than White men and take longer to pay it off, as they earn just 62 cents for every dollar earned by White men. In 2019, nearly a quarter of female-headed households lived in poverty; for households headed by Black or Latina women, the rates were closer to 30 percent.

Only if our recovery is inclusive can we emerge from this crisis stronger.

Inclusivity requires state leadership as well as a comprehensive national strategy to ensure women’s economic security, health and safety. Front-line workers in the pandemic have struggled to keep patients safe amid inadequate staffing and insufficient protective gear such

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women

Opinion | Kamala Harris’s facial expressions at the debate were her strength

Vice President Pence wasn’t following the rules — not about timing, not about interrupting — during Wednesday’s debate. Moderator Susan Page’s efforts at polite shushing, uttering repeated “thank you’s,” was about as effective as a cafeteria monitor trying to halt a food fight. It fell to Harris to remind the vice president, “I’m speaking” — something he already knew but chose to ignore.

If Harris had raised her voice in those moments, she would have been labeled shrill. If she had frowned, she would have been labeled a scold. If she had raised a hand, she would have been called angry or even unhinged.

So she smiled as she held her ground — and of course they called it a smirk, a grin that by definition comes off as irritating or smug. But it was more than that. Harris gave Pence “The Look” — and you don’t have to look

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model

Bullying worsens when leaders model and promote it | Opinion

By Stuart Green

U.S. Rep. Josh Gottheimer’s announcement of new state and national initiatives addressing bullying deserves praise and support. Bullying is a problem for which leadership is a critical part of the solution. It increases when leadership does not address it and worsens when leaders model and promote it.

It is not a coincidence that bullying and bias crimes have increased since 2016, according to studies at the University of Virginia. Multiple studies suggest that bullying victimization is an adverse experience of childhood that contributes to many of the problems we experience as adults, from depression and anxiety to racism and xenophobia.

Bullying is a pattern of negative acts – physical, psychological or social – in which an imbalance of power makes it difficult for those repeatedly hurt to defend themselves. It is very common, with about 20% of all students victimized, year after year, according to a bi-annual

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women

Opinion | Barkha Dutt: The Hathras rape and murder case reveals everything that’s rotten about India

At the capital’s Safdarjung Hospital, where I first met the victim’s family, her younger brother Sandeep told me: “We have struggled alone. My sister had just gone to fetch fodder for the cattle at home. We found her lying in a pool of blood with no clothes on.”

She fought valiantly to live. She had been lying strapped to a hospital bed for 14 days. Her limbs had been broken, and she was paralyzed. Her attackers used the scarf she was wearing to strangle her, and her tongue had been cut. The daughter of impoverished daily wagers, she was moved from town to town and from hospital to hospital. “Take me home” were her last words.

Her killing and its aftermath have shamed us into confronting all that is rotten in India’s system.

Initially, the media had mostly overlooked the horror, as it was fixated on the coverage of a

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women

Opinion | Will Mormon Women Sink Trump in Arizona?

In 2016, Latter-day Saints antipathy and skepticism toward Mr. Trump gave an opening for both Evan McMullin and Gary Johnson, third-party candidates, to grab votes that would typically have gone to the Republican nominee. Sure, Mr. Trump won Utah — but with a meager 45 percent of the vote. Mitt Romney, a devout Mormon well-regarded by fellow members of the church, carried it in 2012 with over 70 percent.

Mr. Romney himself is a key to how a lot of church voters, especially women, view Mr. Trump. The resounding refrain that anyone who has ever talked to a female Mormon voter, or a female Mormon relative, has heard about Romney is that he is “such a good man.”

Mr. Romney has said he will not vote for Mr. Trump. Jeff Flake, the former Arizona senator and a fellow Mormon, has endorsed Mr. Biden.

It’s not just prominent Mormons like them

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women

RBG was able to help women by arguing for the rights of men | Opinion

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is rightfully lionized for blazing the path through which constitutional law came to embrace women’s equality. She is among an elite group of lawyers, Thurgood Marshall among them, who have played an outsized role in facilitating the evolution of constitutional law.

It might seem anathema to refer to the constitution as evolving. You probably have heard originalist arguments that judges are bound to interpret the Constitution’s provisions according to the meaning of the provisions at the time they were adopted. That was the core philosophy of the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who famously said that “the only good Constitution is a dead Constitution,” and is similarly espoused by his former clerk and now Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett, who said in her acceptance speech that Justice Scalia’s “judicial philosophy is mine, too.”

Yet the primary reason our dusty old Constitution has survived for over two-hundred years

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model

Is Donald Trump leading America toward a Belarusian model presidency? (opinion)

The very foundations of America’s legitimacy on the world stage could eventually rest, at least in part, on the question of just how many other countries would even recognize a president who failed to win a clear mandate of the American electorate, and whose victory was based less on a true electoral mandate than on some form of judicial or legal manipulation. This scenario would not be unlike the situation of any number of foreign leaders of questionable legitimacy who have rumbled into office and retained their power on the strength of brute force or simply hubris.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing at the White House September 27, 2020, in Washington, DC. - US President Donald Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes in 2016, the year he won the election, The New York Times reported September 27, 2020, citing tax return data extending more than 20 years. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)


© BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
US President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing at the White House September 27, 2020, in Washington, DC. – US President Donald Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes in 2016, the year he won the election, The New York Times reported September 27, 2020, citing

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