fashion

Fashion Retailer Privacy Fine Points The Way For Pandemic Worker Monitoring And Profiling

Yesterday’s landmark €35M data privacy fine imposed on fashion retailer H&M by the Hamburg Data Protection Commissioner might be dismissed as an anomaly based on very unusual facts, but there are hidden lessons here for all organisations operating in Europe that have implemented new employee monitoring and profiling systems as part of their response to the Pandemic.

Back to work interviews

According to the findings of the German regulator, H&M runs a service centre in Nuremberg where, since 2014, its employees have been required to take part in back to work interviews following holidays and periods of sick leave. During these interviews notes were taken, gathering broad information about private and family lives. In cases of holiday leave notes

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women

The Women Behind Privacy at Facebook, Apple, Google, Etc., on How They Use Your Data

Photo credit: Susanna Hayward / Getty Images - Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Susanna Hayward / Getty Images – Hearst Owned

From Marie Claire

The companies powering our connected lives know our names and addresses, political preferences, moods, and anxieties and the rabbit holes we fall down late at night. When it comes to data privacy, they’re often considered the bad guys, but they have the power to be the good guys too.

Until a comprehensive law is passed, consumers are left to pore over hundreds of lines of obscure lingo in a company’s privacy policy to figure out what a brand is doing with their data. (Who has time for that?) There’s a lot of confusion—some on purpose—but one thing is clear: Americans want transparency. Yesterday. So, we asked the women at tech behemoths working to keep (or regain) user trust to share—no jargon allowed—how their companies are navigating the complex, confusing, and often controversial world of privacy.

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit:
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