women

COVID is Reversing Decades of Progress for Rural Women and Girls

When Idris and I visited Sierra Leone last December, the optimism was palpable. The country was back on its feet after a bitter civil war and an Ebola outbreak in 2014. We met resourceful, resilient women like Isatu, a mother of four, who was transforming swampland into paddy fields with the help of the UN’s International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). She trusted IFAD because it had not abandoned her village when Ebola struck. The agency stayed and supported farmers with access to finance in their most desperate hour.

Back in December, we did not know that a pandemic was about to hit us. And while its impact on our lives in the West has been chronicled exhaustively, we hear little about its effect on the most vulnerable people of all – the 1.7 billion women and girls, more than one-fifth of all humanity, who live in rural areas around

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women

This recession threatens to wipe out decades of progress for U.S. women

Women helped pull the U.S. economy out of the last recession. This time around they are falling behind.

The pandemic is disproportionately affecting women and threatening to wipe out decades of their economic progress. As the crisis drags on, some of the biggest pain points are among women of color and those with young children.

These setbacks — characterized by some economists as the nation’s first female recession — stand in sharp contrast to the dramatic progress women made in the expansion following the last financial crisis. The jobs, income and promotions that women lose as a result of the coronavirus could hold back economic growth and sideline an entire generation of women.

The official data is stark. The September unemployment rate for Black and Hispanic adult women remains above 10%, even though it’s decreased to 6.9% for White women, according to data reported Friday by the Labor Department.

At

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women

Slow Progress On Women’s Rights Decried At UN Summit

More than 170 countries promised during a virtual UN summit Thursday to step up their efforts to advance women’s rights, while the US took aim at China’s claims of leadership on the issue.

The meeting, which took place on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly, marked the 25th anniversary of the seminal 1995 World Conference on Women in Beijing.

“In the coming five years, China will donate another $10 million to UN Women,” President Xi Jinping said in a pre-recorded video, proposing another world meeting on gender equality for 2025.

In her own pre-recorded address, US Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos condemned the treatment of women in Venezuela, Cuba and Iran, but saved her harshest criticism for Beijing.

“The worst violator of all in both scope and scale is the host of the conference we commemorate today,” she said.

“Since 1995, the Chinese Communist Party has been responsible

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women

Companies Need To ‘Lean In’ As Pandemic Threatens Women’s Progress : NPR

The pandemic is eroding progress made by women in the workplace, a new report by Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In foundation finds.

Dominic Lipinski/PA Images via Getty Images


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Dominic Lipinski/PA Images via Getty Images

The pandemic is eroding progress made by women in the workplace, a new report by Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In foundation finds.

Dominic Lipinski/PA Images via Getty Images

As a champion for women “leaning in” at work, Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer at Facebook, is worried.

The coronavirus pandemic, and related issues like lack of childcare and school, are taking a disproportionately heavy toll on working women, with effects that will be felt for years to come, according to a new report from Sandberg’s Lean In foundation and McKinsey & Company.

The sixth annual Women In The Workplace report found that 1 in 4 women are considering scaling back

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women

The First Female Recession Threatens to Wipe Out Decades of Progress for U.S. Women

(Bloomberg) — Women helped pull the U.S. economy out of the last recession. This time around they are falling behind.

The pandemic is disproportionately affecting women and threatening to wipe out decades of their economic progress. As the crisis drags on, some of the biggest pain points are among women of color and those with young children.

These setbacks — characterized by some economists as the nation’s first female recession — stand in sharp contrast to the dramatic progress women made in the expansion following the last financial crisis. The jobs, income and promotions that women lose as a result of the coronavirus could hold back economic growth and sideline an entire generation of women.



chart: Uneven Joblessness


© Bloomberg
Uneven Joblessness

The official data are stark. The unemployment rate for Black and Hispanic adult women remains above 10%, even though it’s decreased to 7.3% for White women, according to data from the

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women

As Women Fight to Maintain Progress, Companies Need to Reimagine How They Operate

For years, American corporations tried to increase job flexibility with scant success. The pandemic ushered in more flexibility, along with added responsibilities and few boundaries. For women, who typically shoulder more duties at home regardless of their breadwinning status, that has felt less like freedom than pressure to be always on.

We’re seeing the consequences in our sixth annual Women in the Workplace study, a joint effort by McKinsey & Co. and LeanIn.Org that is the largest annual benchmark of women’s progress in American corporations. More than one in four women say they may now quit or scale back their jobs. Among women at the managerial level and above, 30% want to step down or out. As a group, women could lose more than five years of gains across the career pipeline.

This is not simply a pause on the road to a more equitable workplace. This year’s report finds

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