women

In Belarus, Women Led the Protests and Shattered Stereotypes

MINSK, Belarus — With masked riot police officers massing nearby, threatening to attack protesters like him with batons and fists, Aleksei D. Zulevsky felt safe for the first time in weeks of anti-government unrest in Belarus: He was surrounded by hundreds of women he knew would shield him.

“I feel protected here,” said Mr. Zulevsky, as fellow protesters, many holding red and white flags, the banner of the opposition, chanted at a rally last month. “Only cowards beat women!”

In a country whose strongman president, Aleksandr. G Lukashenko, has openly scoffed at women as too weak for politics and told them their place was in the kitchen, Belarusian women have become the face and driving force of a movement aimed at toppling a leader known as “Europe’s last dictator.”

That effort may be flagging, with Mr. Lukashenko refusing to give up power even though tens of thousands of people continue

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women

‘SNL’: Megan Thee Stallion protests for Breonna Taylor case

Megan Thee Stallion delivered a politically charged performance of “Savage” for the Season 46 premiere of “SNL” on Saturday, taking a moment to protest the Breonna Taylor ruling and injustice against Black women.

The rapper performed a remix of her chart-topping song in front of a black screen emblazoned with the message “Protect Black Women” (and later bullet holes), pausing midway to play audio clips from Malcolm X’s famous “Who Taught You to Hate Yourself?” speech from 1962 as well as one from activist Tamika Mallory.

“Daniel Cameron is no different than the sellout Negros that sold our people into slavery,” Mallory could be heard saying, referring to the Kentucky Atty. Gen. who led the Taylor case. Taylor was killed in her apartment in March by Louisville police officers. A grand jury failed to charge any of the officers involved.

Megan Thee Stallion also played two clips from the Malcolm

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jewelry

Downtown Portland jewelry store intends to sue city for handling of protests

A downtown Portland jewelry store owner intends to sue the City of Portland for its handling of protests in late May.

Noha Kassab, CEO of Kassab Jewelers, said her family-owned store was was broken into and looted early in the morning on May 30. This was during the beginning stages of what would lead to more than 100 days of protest in Portland.

“I started looking on my phone to see who was in my store, it was bunch of people going into the store, broke glass, it was the most painful, disheartening experience I ever faced,” said Kassab.

The store owner said they are still calculating the costs, but estimates $2.5 million in damages.

“I’m not someone who came to this country with money. I came with an American dream. To see my American dream destroyed and it could have been preventable, is disheartening,” said Kassab.

Kassab filed tort

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women

Protests Erupt in India Following Woman’s Death in Rape Case

(Bloomberg) — A series of rapes committed on women from India’s lowest castes are making national headlines across the South Asian nation of 1.3 billion, fueling street protests and social media outrage that’s put Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s administration under the spotlight.

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A 19-year-old woman from the Dalit caste — the lowest rung in Hinduism’s complex social hierarchy — died in a New Delhi hospital on Tuesday, two weeks after she was allegedly gang raped by upper caste men from her north Indian village. Her mutilated body was found by her mother in the fields of her village in Hathras, in Uttar Pradesh.

Anger was already simmering in the country over her death but it spilled onto the streets Wednesday and Thursday following news reports that local police cremated the woman’s body in the middle of the night without her family present. Network station NDTV showed her relatives

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women

The Armed Women at the Center of the Louisville Protests

The presence of the armed security teams are a reminder of how far the nationwide protests, now entering their fifth month, have come from the mostly spontaneous demonstrations that erupted in the days after George Floyd’s killing in Minneapolis. Now, a state of tense permanence has taken hold in cities across the country where almost nightly marches proceed with clockwork regularity through shuttered downtowns. But the routine is spiked with an air of unpredictability. With weapons in the hands of people on all sides—the protesters, the police and the right-wing militias who periodically appear—any night is a cat-and-mouse test of constitutional limits in which the guardrails against deadly violence are fragile at best.

“This is a war zone, basically,” Mitchell said. “The very moment I decided to come here the first day to protest, I knew that I was prepared to die for this. I am prepared to sacrifice my

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women

Live Updates: Protests For Racial Justice : NPR

A memorial to Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind outside the apartment where Greywind lived with her parents in Fargo, N.D., pictured in 2017. Savanna’s Act requires the Department of Justice to strengthen training, coordination and data collection in cases of murdered or missing Native Americans.

Dave Kolpack/AP


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Dave Kolpack/AP

A memorial to Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind outside the apartment where Greywind lived with her parents in Fargo, N.D., pictured in 2017. Savanna’s Act requires the Department of Justice to strengthen training, coordination and data collection in cases of murdered or missing Native Americans.

Dave Kolpack/AP

Last week, the House passed Savanna’s Act, a bill that requires the Department of Justice to strengthen training, coordination, data collection and other guidelines related to cases of murdered or missing Native Americans. It aims to address the alarming number of cases involving Native women.

Former North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp first introduced the bill in

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