women

Amy Coney Barrett’s extreme views put women’s rights in jeopardy

Recently, news broke that Amy Coney Barrett, Trump’s deeply-conservative nominee to the Supreme Court, supported an anti-choice group whose extreme views include criminalizing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment. In a 2006 newspaper advertisement signed by Barrett, St. Joseph Right to Life advocated for defending “the right to life from fertilization to natural death.”



a close up of a woman: Amy Coney Barrett's extreme views put women's rights in jeopardy


© Bonnie Cash
Amy Coney Barrett’s extreme views put women’s rights in jeopardy

Jackie Appleman, the group’s executive director, told the Guardian that St. Joseph Right to Life “would be supportive of criminalizing the discarding of frozen embryos or selective reduction through the IVF process.”

Appleman went on to say that they are not supportive of criminalizing women “at this point.” Count me unconvinced.

Barrett’s anti-choice record was already alarming and well-documented. Still, her decision to support such a group is an example of just how far outside the mainstream she and other anti-choice politicians are

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wedding

RHOA ‘s Cynthia Bailey Details the COVID-19 Safety Measures Put in Place for Her Wedding

Cynthia Bailey/Instagram

Cynthia Bailey can’t wait to say “I do” to fiancé Mike Hill in front of her friends and family — her masked friends and family, that is.

Ahead of her Georgia wedding on Saturday, the Real Housewives of Atlanta star opens up to PEOPLE about the “strict” COVID-19 precautions she put in place in order to ensure the safety of their guests.

“Usually, my concern before the wedding would be more focused on a lot of the aesthetics of the wedding,” Bailey tells PEOPLE. “However, because we are getting married in a pandemic, the focus has turned to: Do we have the thermometers for the temperature checks? Do we have sanitizer stations?”

“We aren’t messing around,” she adds.

The couple is set to wed at the Governors Towne Club in Acworth, Georgia. The ceremony was originally set to take place outdoors to accommodate their 250-person guest list, but

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fashion

Kenzo Takada Helped Put Asia on the Global Fashion Map

Before Kenzo, it was hard for many in the fashion world to imagine an Asian designer at the top of Paris haute couture. After Kenzo, Asian talent drawing inspiration from the East and beyond transformed the industry.

Japan-born Kenzo Takada, who died at age 81 on Oct. 4 near Paris, brought the roominess and boxiness of the kimono to contemporary clothing as well as bold floral designs and jungle prints. His models sometimes danced on the runway.

“My common theme was ‘freeing the body from clothing,’ ” Mr. Takada wrote in a series of autobiographical essays for the Nikkei newspaper published in December 2016 and later translated into English. “Rather than squeezing the body tightly, I wanted to make clothes that focused on the wearability of a loose silhouette.”

A model in a loose design by Kenzo at a 1975 presentation of his fall-winter ready-to-wear collection in Paris.



Photo:

AFP

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