women

Designing Women Cast Reunites for Table Read and Q&A to Support Racial Justice Activism

Fans of Designing Women can experience the iconic show’s pilot episode in a whole new way.



Julia Duffy, Annie Potts, Meshach Taylor, Dixie Carter, Jan Hooks posing for the camera: Everett Collection


© Provided by People
Everett Collection

Sony Pictures Television has teamed up with members of the original cast of Designing Women to host a charity table read and Q&A on Thursday.

The online event will help to raise money and awareness for Color of Change, the nation’s largest online racial justice organization, and World Central Kitchen’s COVID-19 relief efforts.

Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE’s free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer, from juicy celebrity news to compelling human interest stories

Fans will get to see costars Jean Smart (Charlene Frazier-Stillfield), Annie Potts (Mary Jo Shively), Sheryl Lee Ralph (now as Mrs. Sundemeyer) and Scott Bakula (Ted Shively) read through the shows 1986 pilot episode, with some help from famous fans Leslie Jordan

Read More Read more
fashion

The Fashion Industry’s Racial Reckoning : Code Switch : NPR

Code Switch interviews senior critic-at-large Robin Givhan about the uptick in magazine covers featuring black women this September.

NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

NPR

Code Switch interviews senior critic-at-large Robin Givhan about the uptick in magazine covers featuring black women this September.

NPR

If you’ve been looking at the fall fashion and lifestyle magazines that have been published over the past few weeks, you’ll notice that a lot of the covers feature Black people. That, says Robin Givhan — longtime fashion writer for the Washington Post and now a senior critic-at-large for the paper — is no coincidence.

The fashion world, like many industries and institutions, is experiencing a reckoning on race. Condé Nast, the 800-pound gorilla of lifestyle and luxury publishing, was shaken several months ago when Adam Rapoport, the editor of one of its flagship publications, Bon Appetit, stepped down after his staff accused him of racist

Read More Read more
women

Black women sue Denver over alleged racial, gender discrimination in fire department

Two Black women sued the city of Denver on Wednesday over allegations that members of the Denver Fire Department systematically discriminated against them both because of their gender and their race.

Da Lesha Allen and Charmaine Cassie say they unfairly faced tougher standards and stricter scrutiny than their white male colleagues, and that colleagues and supervisors made racist comments about their hair and bodies and applied racist stereotypes to the women after they joined the department in 2019 and 2018, respectively.

One fire captain told Cassie that she would struggle to get through the fire department’s training program because of the department’s culture, and said that she should “keep her head down and act like a slave” in order to graduate from the training, according to the lawsuit.

A lieutenant commented several times on Cassie’s body, including declaring that she had a “big butt,” according to the federal lawsuit. In

Read More Read more
women

Live Updates: Protests For Racial Justice : NPR

A memorial to Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind outside the apartment where Greywind lived with her parents in Fargo, N.D., pictured in 2017. Savanna’s Act requires the Department of Justice to strengthen training, coordination and data collection in cases of murdered or missing Native Americans.

Dave Kolpack/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Dave Kolpack/AP

A memorial to Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind outside the apartment where Greywind lived with her parents in Fargo, N.D., pictured in 2017. Savanna’s Act requires the Department of Justice to strengthen training, coordination and data collection in cases of murdered or missing Native Americans.

Dave Kolpack/AP

Last week, the House passed Savanna’s Act, a bill that requires the Department of Justice to strengthen training, coordination, data collection and other guidelines related to cases of murdered or missing Native Americans. It aims to address the alarming number of cases involving Native women.

Former North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp first introduced the bill in

Read More Read more