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Fort Collins’ Meanwhile Back at the Ranch to close after decades

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With “retirement sale” signs bannering her Old Town Square storefront, Ann Stephens looked up from her work behind the glowing display cases of turquoise bolo ties, silver money clips and shelves of handmade Native American rings, bracelets and necklaces Friday morning.  

Dressed in a crisp white blouse and khaki pants, Ann’s simple attire was offset by gleaming pieces from her own jewelry collection — a sparkling silver bracelet, an heirloom silver and turquoise pin, a pair of rings and a silver pendant necklace inlaid with a stack of small, multicolored stones.

I was there to discuss her pending retirement and the forthcoming closure of her store, Meanwhile Back at the Ranch, which has been a must-stop for Native American jewelry, art and artifacts since opening at 3 Old Town Square in 1993.

Ann obliged, dutifully running me through the 27-year history

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style

For those seeking adventure and style, Slippery Rock River Ranch awaits you

Escape the mundane and find the extraordinary at Slippery Rock River Ranch. This incredible mountain getaway presents the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to own an experience, rather than just a property. Slippery Rock River Ranch, which has recently gone under contract, is located at 27551 Highway 145, in Dolores, Colorado. LIV Sotheby’s International Realty’s Telluride-based broker, Teddy Errico, has the pleasure of representing this listing, which is available for $6,200,000.

Nestled on a sprawling 36 acres in the Four Corners region of Southwest Colorado, sits a uniquely modern, yet rustic retreat. Nearly every aspect of the property has been updated to transform the ranch-style fishing lodge into an elevated vacation experience. The compound has everything one might need for a weekend away in nature but with a more luxurious twist.

“Slippery Rock River Ranch is an absolutely amazing property,” said Errico. “There are few listings in the entire state of Colorado that

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model

LDS Church’s northern Utah ranch is proving to be a model for Western livestock grazing

Livestock grazing has taken a heavy toll on Western rangelands since the arrival of domestic cattle and sheep that were bred for much damper climates.



a man that is standing in the grass: (Brett Prettyman | Tribune file photo) Rick Danvir, wildlife manager for Deseret Land and Livestock Ranch, points out a popular elk area while touring the private land in northern Utah with Boyd Blackwell of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, in this 2008 file photo. The 200,000-acre Rich County ranch is one of many large agricultural operations owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints around the nation.


© Provided by Salt Lake Tribune
(Brett Prettyman | Tribune file photo) Rick Danvir, wildlife manager for Deseret Land and Livestock Ranch, points out a popular elk area while touring the private land in northern Utah with Boyd Blackwell of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, in this 2008 file photo. The 200,000-acre Rich County ranch is one of many large agricultural operations owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints around the nation.

These animals, which have contributed greatly to the West’s pioneer heritage, have damaged fragile alpine and desert ecosystems, fouled stream corridors and rearranged native plant communities, environmentalist say.

While they contend public lands grazing is not sustainable in its time-worn form, Utah’s notably dry and cold Monte Cristo

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