beauty

Nordstrom Launches In-Store Beauty Packaging Recycling Program

(Credit: Pixabay)

Nordstrom customers can now recycle all brands of beauty packaging in-store.

For this initiative, the retailer partnered with TerraCycle and Beautycycle, the first beauty take-back and recycling program accepting all brands of beauty packaging at a major retailer. Customers can now bring in their empty beauty product packaging to be recycled at any of Nordstrom’s full-line stores or Nordstrom Local service hubs in the continental United States. Through this program, Nordstrom aims to take back 100 tons of hard-to-recycle beauty packaging by 2025 to ensure it’s recycled. According to Nordstrom, many municipal recycling centers do not accept beauty materials and packaging, as they often contain a mix of materials that are not locally recyclable.

How it works

  • Customers can bring their empty beauty products to any Nordstrom or Nordstrom Local to be recycled. Beautycycle boxes will be available in the beauty department.
  • Nordstrom will send the content of
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clothing

Decatur takes over recycling, adds clothing pickup point

DECATUR — The covid-19 pandemic affected more than just restaurants and other small businesses.

The recycling industry took a big loss due to the pandemic, forcing companies to shut down pickup in many area towns. But Decatur worked out a deal that would continue the recycling program that many area residents and businesses used on almost a daily basis.

Mayor Bob Tharp received a correspondence dated Aug. 26 from Wendy Bland, director of the Benton County Solid Waste District, stating the recycling program in Decatur will be discontinued Sept. 4.

“We are saddened and deeply regret that the Solid Waste District no longer has funding available to provide the free recycling trailer service,” Bland wrote. “It was not caused by the District and is not something that we have control over. This was a sudden blow to our budget that was completely unexpected. We had very little notice ourselves in

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beauty

Nordstrom’s New Circular Beauty Initiative Makes Recycling Products Easier Than Ever

Creating a circular beauty industry is proving incredibly difficult. The cosmetics and personal care categories face an obstacle course on their quest for sustainability, with hoops to jump through that include toxic ingredients, hazardous waste from common items like nail polish and perfume, plus so, so much plastic. The United Nations estimates that we produce 300 million tons of plastic trash every year (nearly the weight of the entire human population), and beauty packaging is largely to blame thanks to pumps, mirrored compacts, and caps that can’t be processed by curbside recycling programs. Up to this point, much of the innovation in low-impact environmental practices has been led by adaptable indie brands that set the standard for Big Beauty with clever mushroom-based Styrofoam alternatives and compostable materials. Today, Nordstrom’s TerraCycle partnership takes a significant step toward a more circular future with BeautyCycle, a product take-back and recycling initiative accepting a

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fashion

Height of fashion? Clothes mountains build up as recycling breaks down

MADRID/NAIROBI (Reuters) – Clothes recycling is the pressure-release valve of fast fashion, and it’s breaking under COVID-19 curbs.

A worker carries a bale of imported second-hand clothes past displayed apparel, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak at the Gikomba market in Nairobi, Kenya September 18, 2020. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

The multi-billion-dollar trade in second-hand clothing helps prevent the global fashion industry’s growing pile of waste going straight to landfill, while keeping wardrobes clear for next season’s designs. But it’s facing a crisis.

Exporters are struggling, as are traders and customers in often poorer nations from Africa to Eastern Europe and Latin America who rely on a steady supply of used clothes.

The signs are everywhere.

From London to Los Angeles, many thrift shops and clothing banks outside stores and on streets have been deluged with more clothes than could be sold on, leading to mountains of

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fashion

Height of Fashion? Clothes Mountains Build up as Recycling Breaks Down | Top News

By Sonya Dowsett and George Obulutsa

MADRID/NAIROBI (Reuters) – Clothes recycling is the pressure-release valve of fast fashion, and it’s breaking under COVID-19 curbs.

The multi-billion-dollar trade in second-hand clothing helps prevent the global fashion industry’s growing pile of waste going straight to landfill, while keeping wardrobes clear for next season’s designs. But it’s facing a crisis.

Exporters are struggling, as are traders and customers in often poorer nations from Africa to Eastern Europe and Latin America who rely on a steady supply of used clothes.

The signs are everywhere.

From London to Los Angeles, many thrift shops and clothing banks outside stores and on streets have been deluged with more clothes than could be sold on, leading to mountains of garments building up in sorting warehouses.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began early this year, textile recyclers and exporters have had to cut their prices to shift stock as lockdown

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