model

Researchers develop new model to observe self-optimization phenomenon in neuronal networks

Researchers at the Cyber-Physical Systems Group at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, in conjunction with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have developed a new model of how information deep in the brain could flow from one network to another and how these neuronal network clusters self-optimize over time.

Their work, chronicled in the paper “Network Science Characteristics of Brain-Derived Neuronal Cultures Deciphered From Quantitative Phase Imaging Data,” is believed to be the first study to observe this self-optimization phenomenon in in vitro neuronal networks, and counters existing models. Their findings can open new research directions for biologically inspired artificial intelligence, detection of brain cancer and diagnosis and may contribute to or inspire new Parkinson’s treatment strategies.

The team examined the structure and evolution of neuronal networks in the brains of mice and rats in order to identify the connectivity patterns.

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USC researchers build model showing how many coronavirus infections masks prevent | Health

University of South Carolina researchers have developed a model of the coronavirus pandemic showing that masks have stemmed the spread of disease and prevented tens of thousands of infections in places that have adopted them widely.

The team’s aim is to put hard numbers on a refrain that public health experts have repeated for months: that masks make a difference and could bring the virus to heel. The lead researcher says he wanted to give decision-makers a clear view of how big that difference is.

That’s particularly significant in South Carolina, which doesn’t have a statewide mask requirement. Instead, questions about whether to wear a mask are far more localized here. It’s up to local governments to decide whether to require them, and for the millions of people here who aren’t bound by mandates, wearing a mask is an individual decision.

The USC model, developed by the university’s Automated Intelligence

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Researchers create p16-Cre ERT2 -tdTomato mouse model to characterize in vivo senescent cells

Cell senescence is a state of permanent cell cycle arrest that was initially defined for cells grown in cell culture. It plays a key role in age-associated organ dysfunction and age-related diseases such as cancer, but the in vivo pathogenesis is largely unclear.

A research team led by Professor Makoto Nakanishi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, generated a p16-Cre ERT2 -tdTomato mouse model to characterize in vivo p16 high cells at the single-cell level.

They found tdTomato-positive p16 high cells detectable in all organs, which were enriched with age. They also found that these cells failed to proliferate and had half-lives ranging from 2.6 to 4.2 months, depending on the tissue examined.

Single-cell transcriptomics in the liver and kidneys revealed that p16 high cells were present in various cell types, though most dominant in hepatic endothelium and

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UW researchers driving around Seattle using Street View-style camera to study response to pandemic

In images of of the streets of Seattle, University of Washington researchers are using algorithms to help identify things such as cars, people and whether they are physically distancing in each frame of (University of Washington Photo)

The COVID-19 pandemic has altered life as we know it in Seattle, and a team from the University of Washington is conducting research using images from around the city to better understand just how much.

Since May, researchers have been driving around Seattle, scanning the streets with a car-mounted camera similar to Google’s Street View technology. Images capture a particular point in time and illustrate whether people are outside, how many cars are on the road, which business are open and so forth. According to UW News, researchers hope the massive data set will help answer questions about what makes a city resilient and how to better prepare for potential future pandemics and

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women

Researchers reveal the perfect ‘flirty’ face for women: study

Sometimes, all it takes is a look.

For some single people, it can be hard to tell when someone is actually flirting with you. Fortunately for them, new research suggests that there may be a specific facial expression that women use when they’re flirting.

A study published in the Journal of Sex Research says that there are certain facial expressions that signify interest in a potential partner.

A study published in the Journal of Sex Research says that there are certain facial expressions that signify interest in a potential partner.
(iStock)

A study published in the Journal of Sex Research says that there are certain facial expressions that signify interest in a potential partner, Southwest News Service (SWNS) reports. According to the study, men can recognize this expression as showing attraction.

BROOKLYN BRIDGE PROPOSAL GOES VIRAL OVER BIKE ACCIDENT

The flirty facial expression that seems to work best for women is to turn the head to one side, tilt it down slightly with a slight smile and have the eyes turned toward the

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