model

Sea-Level Rise Projections can Improve With State-of-the-Art Model

New ice-sheet “emulator” focuses on Antarctica, Rutgers research shows

Crane Glacier

The Crane Glacier on the Antarctic Peninsula in 2003. The peninsula’s Larsen B Ice Shelf disintegrated into thousands of pieces in 2002, and the glacier retreated. Photo: Ted Scambos/NSIDC


Projections of potentially dramatic sea-level rise from ice-sheet melting in Antarctica have been wide-ranging, but a Rutgers-led team has created a model that enables improved projections and could help better address climate change threats.

A major source of sea-level rise could come from melting of large swaths of the vast Antarctic ice sheet. Fossil coral reefs jutting above the ocean’s surface show evidence that sea levels were more than 20 feet higher about 125,000 years ago during the warm Last Interglacial (Eemian) period.

“Evidence of sea-level rise in warm climates long ago can tell us a lot about how sea levels could rise in the future,” said lead author Daniel M.

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