model

Theoretical model explains biological phenomena that keep bacteria in shape

Fat bacteria? Skinny bacteria? From our perspective on high, they all seem to be about the same size. In fact, they are.

Precisely why has been an open question, according to Rice University chemist Anatoly Kolomeisky, who now has a theory.

A primal mechanism in bacteria that keeps them in their personal Goldilocks zones — that is, just right — appears to depend on two random means of regulation, growth and division, that cancel each other out. The same mechanism may give researchers a new perspective on disease, including cancer.

The “minimal model” by Kolomeisky, Rice postdoctoral researcher and lead author Hamid Teimouri and Rupsha Mukherjee, a former research assistant at Rice now at the Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, appears in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

Everywhere we see bacteria, they more or less have

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beauty

Eternal Beauty review: A perfect showcase for Shape of Water star Sally Hawkins

Guillermo del Toro once said that when he casts a movie, he casts eyes. The main eyes in his Best Picture winner The Shape of Water belong to Sally Hawkins, and they’re impossible to confuse with anyone else’s. There’s a warmth to her face that’s used well in films like Paddington and Happy-Go-Lucky, but there’s a brittleness to her features, too. Her forehead always seems furrowed in sadness or concern, even when she’s smiling, as if she could break down at any moment. Her latest role, as the lead in Craig Roberts’ Eternal Beauty, takes full advantage of that dangerous, fragile quality.

Hawkins stars as Jane, a woman struggling with schizophrenia and depression. Her visits to her doctor, who reproaches her for saying she’s “doing fine” instead of “doing better,” are fruitless, and her medication isn’t making her feel any better. Her family — her mother Vivian (Penelope

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