fashion

Pumpkin Spice Is Your Ultimate Fall Fashion Palette

Photo credit: Tyler Joe
Photo credit: Tyler Joe

From Marie Claire

It’s official, we are well into the “brrrr” months (September, October, November…), and along with that chill in the air comes something many have been waiting for all year: pumpkin spice. It is undeniably everywhere you turn. Commercials, menus, your local coffee bar, your local actual bar (you know, the one that’s currently serving on the sidewalk)—pumpkin spice has become the most unlikely 21st-century phenomenon, the one you never knew you wanted until you were told you did.

This craze can be traced to one particular mermaid-branded caffeine slinger that has been dealing in PSLs (pumpkin spice lattes, obv.) since the early 2000s. But—hold on to your candy corns!—it doesn’t stop there; pumpkin spice is a $600 million a year industry. For such a moneymaker, though, pumpkin spice is rather divisive. For some, the mere suggestion of a PSL can trigger a gag

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women

Tukwila’s Spice Bridge Food Hall helps women business owners turn their restaurant dreams into reality

Light streams through the windows at the new Spice Bridge Food Hall in Tukwila, further illuminating the butter-yellow walls. The air is filled with the scent of grilled chicken kebabs and coffee, but perhaps the best part is the sound of laughter from women chatting.

Kara Martin, program director for the Food Innovation Network (FIN), gestures to the ceiling, remarking on the need to get some sound baffles, but for now the symphony of laughter is the welcome sound of success.

Spice Bridge is the home of FIN’s Food Business Incubator, a program that helps provide women immigrants and refugees in South King County with everything from permit assistance and marketing guidance to rent subsidies and mentoring.

Spice Bridge, a 2,800-square-foot Tukwila global food hall, is home to four retail stalls and cook stations, a commercial kitchen and dining area.   (Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times)
Spice Bridge, a 2,800-square-foot Tukwila global food hall, is home to four retail stalls and cook stations, a commercial kitchen and dining area. (Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times)

FIN is a program

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