clothing

New Clothing Start-Up, Frankly, Is Making the Pandemic’s Braless Trend Permanent

CHICAGO, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — With new work-from-home policies and fewer excuses to go out, many women have been opting out of bras and into a more comfortable lifestyle during the pandemic. Frankly, a clothing start-up, aims to make this shift permanent with their new collection of braless clothing – launching today on Kickstarter.

While some may argue athleisure is here to stay, co-founders Jane Dong and Heather Eaton are confident the joy of dressing up won’t disappear any time soon. Especially if it just became easier. With Frankly, women can have the best of both worlds: the ease of loungewear and the chic look of designer clothing.

“Women shouldn’t have to choose between style and comfort,” COO Jane Dong says. “That’s why we’re designing fashionable clothing that has the same support bras offer, but without the discomfort or inconvenience.”

Frankly’s debut line features an array of

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jewelry

Richardson startup Layerist launches jewelry styling service that anticipates what you want

Growing up in a family with three sisters, Hannah Brown, 37, is a little nostalgic about opening gifts with her siblings on Christmas morning.

She’d often order jewelry and accessories to match her sisters’ styles. But when the gifts arrived, they weren’t quite the color or quality she expected. Yet her mother was always able to pick out gifts she wasn’t expecting but ended up really enjoying.

Capturing that feeling of Christmas morning year-round is what Brown and her business partner, Kelsey Fraley, 33, want to create with their Richardson-based startup Layerist.co. The jewelry and accessory styling service launched its website last week.

“It would be really great if someone really knew our style, and could just send us a box of stuff, and we could try it on, hold it and see the quality,” Brown said.

The concept for Layerist is similar to the serendipity achieved by popular apparel

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women

How to Raise Money for Your Startup

We asked the members of the 2020 Female Founders 100 for their best advice about money. These are the highlights.

Suma Wealth
If you go into a room where everyone looks the same and no one looks like you, think, “No one has my experience, and that’s why I’m valuable.”

Eight Sleep
To build a strong, diverse investor roster, you need to start early and be patient. It’s much easier and better to get women investors in the early rounds.

The Alinker Inventions
All my employees make a living wage, as determined by the MIT calculator. I think I make around $21 an hour. I refuse to focus on money: It takes all of us to run this company and to build this community.

Heal
Just when you think you really should give up: Don’t. With the five minutes extra that you put in, there might be someone around the

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fashion

How a founder bootstrapped her fashion startup to a profitable $2 million in revenue with bags made of apples and no investors

Samara CEO Samila Visram, right, and her sister Samara, left.
  • Samila Visram founded sustainable fashion brand Samara in 2017 after she couldn’t find a bag that was “cruelty free, simple, and elegant.”
  • The brand sells bags, clothing and accessories made from ethically-sourced sustainable materials like apple leather, bamboo and castor oil.
  • A chunk of the company’s profits go to supporting Visram’s other venture, Soular, which provides children in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania with backpacks that have solar-powered lights so they do homework without expensive kerosene.
  • Visram said Samara is profitable and has been “since day one,” generating $2 million a year in revenue.
  • Doing small production runs, maintaining a staff of four who perform many roles, and handling projects like photoshoots in-house have all helped keep costs down, Visram said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Bags made out of apple leather. Sunglasses made out of castor oil.

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women

Startup Panorama Edition 10.0: Women In Tech

To say that being an entrepreneur is difficult would be an understatement.



a man and a woman looking at a laptop


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That’s just the job description.

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But being a female entrepreneur, in a male-dominated tech space – anywhere in the world – takes difficult to a whole new, far more demanding level that makes it difficult to excel.

However, the state of women-owned startups in the Dubai has come a long way with a powerhouse of female tech founders who have blazed a trail of success and innovation across different industries. They are active in financial, consumer and retail, lifestyle and healthcare sectors, among others, and have raised millions in funding despite the odds, and as the UAE government continues to champion and support gender balance.

Startup Panorama Edition 10.0 features the inspiring stories of some of Dubai’s women in tech on the hurdles they faced, support they found in the ecosystem and why they

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style

The pitch deck timeshare booking startup Koala used to nab $3.4 million

  • Koala, a timeshare marketplace that is attempting to bring Airbnb-style digital marketplace to the old-school timeshare industry, launched in August of this year. 
  • Earlier this year, the company raised a $3.4 million Series A round from real estate investors Ira Lubert and Dean Adler.
  • The company provided Business Insider with a copy of the pitch deck it used to raise that Series A round. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Short-term rental startup Koala launched an online marketplace for timeshares in August, hoping to bring Airbnb-style digital transformation to a decidedly old-school form of travel.

The company raised a $3.4 million Series A round in March, which funded the launch. KOALA got the funding just as the coronavirus pandemic shut down much of the world’s economy, and was led by real estate investors Ira Lubert and Dean Adler, the founders of private equity real estate fund Lubert-Adler.

Timeshares, which

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model

As Pandemic Boosts Suburban-Home Demand, Startup Sells a New Ownership Model

Americans feeling trapped at home during the pandemic want more space. The creators of a new startup think they can deliver it with a fresh spin on the timeshare business.

Pacaso, a venture between two Zillow Group Inc. alumni, is using a vacation model to sell ownership in weekend homes.

Similar to a traditional timeshare, Pacaso will give buyers the right to use the house a certain number of weeks a year. But where timeshares typically cluster in holiday hot spots like beach towns or mountain resorts, many of Pacaso’s homes will be located in suburban and other residential neighborhoods.

“This is not just for Napa Valley, Santa Barbara or fancy vacation destinations,” said Spencer Rascoff, Zillow Group’s former chief executive and a Pacaso co-founder. “This is for that lake outside of Detroit, where maybe you’ve had your eye on getting a little lodge.”

A home in Hilton Head, S.C.

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beauty

Sisu: Cosmetic surgery startup raises $5.5 million for US expansion

  • Sisu, a new chain of beauty clinics founded out of Ireland, has raised $5.5 million in Series A VC funding from Greycroft and Bullpen Capital. 
  • Sisu’s clinics offer Botox, anti-wrinkle injections, and teeth whitening, and other aesthetic procedures.
  • “People are increasingly getting procedures done not for vanity but because they want to change subtle features,” Sisu cofounder Dr Brian Cotter told Business Insider in an interview.  
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Beauty disruptor Sisu has raised $5.5 million in Series A funding from Greycroft and Bullpen Capital. 

Sisu, founded out of Ireland, is a chain of beauty clinics that offers aesthetic procedures such as Botox, anti-wrinkle injections, and teeth whitening.

Despite its clinics closing during the main months of the coronavirus pandemic, Sisu is confident that it can succeed in a market which is set to be worth $15.9 billion by 2025, per Markets and Markets.

“People are

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