women

Women bear brunt of Covid-related work stress, UK study finds

Women are being disproportionately affected by a rise in mental health problems caused by increasing workloads as people do their jobs from home amid the pandemic.



a person standing in front of a laptop computer: Photograph: borchee/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: borchee/Getty Images

The length of the working day has increased steadily, resulting in a 49% rise in mental distress reported by employees when compared with 2017-19. Women are bearing the brunt of problems as they juggle work and childcare, according to a report by the 4 Day Week campaign and thinktanks Compass and Autonomy.

The report, Burnout Britain, comes a day before World Mental Health Day and shows that women are 43% more likely to have increased their hours beyond a standard working week than men, and for those with children, this was even more clearly associated with mental health problems: 86% of women who are carrying out a standard working week alongside childcare, which is more than

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model

How Maryland’s Total Cost Of Care Model Has Helped Hospitals Manage The COVID-19 Stress Test

The Maryland Total Cost of Care (TCOC) model, one of the nation’s most innovative advanced alternative payment models, is about to enter year three. This demonstration and partnership with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is testing hospital global budgets, as evolved from its 2014 beginnings, and is guided by the state’s Health Services Cost Review Commission (HSCRC).

We believe the COVID-19 pandemic represents an important opportunity to assess this global budget model under stress—with implications for future health care financing. One of us (Chris L. Peterson) served as the principal deputy director of payment reform and provider alignment at the HSCRC from 2016 to 2020. The other (Dale N. Schumacher) has represented hospital medical staff in prospective payment negotiations with the HSCRC and has published analyses of Maryland hospital performance. In this post, we describe how the TCOC model has provided flexibility and stability to Maryland’s private-sector hospitals

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women

COVID-19 stress has greater impact on women than men, UH study finds

Women report higher stress levels than men on average, according to the American Psychological Association, so it’s no surprise that COVID-19 has heightened those worries.

The University of Houston recently surveyed 1,063 Houston-area residents in a new study, as reported by the Houston Chronicle’s Julian Gill, and found that nearly 34 percent of women felt anxious almost every day, or more than half of each week, compared to 25 percent of men.

TELL US HOW YOU REALLY FEEL: Houston and Texas politicians react to news that Trump tested positive for COVID-19

About 26 percent of women said they experienced no anxiety at all, compared to 43 percent of men.


“The survey shows that the adverse impact of COVID-19 has been widespread,” as reported by UH’s Hobby School of Public Affairs. “Almost 30% of respondents expressed that they personally know someone who has contracted the COVID-19 virus. More than 10% of

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women

To cope with pandemic stress, many women turned to alcohol, continuing a worrying trend

Alcohol-related deaths are on the rise in the U.S., a report published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds.

The report, from the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, found that deaths from alcohol use increased by 43 percent from 2006 to 2018.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

The findings, which don’t include data from this year, come as other research highlights how drinking remains a problem for many in the U.S., particularly among women.

Indeed, the CDC report found that the impact was greatest on women. “While rates were higher for males than females for each year,” the study authors wrote, “the rate of change was greater for females.”

The report didn’t give reasons for the increase among women, but it suggested that women living far outside city limits may have been more at risk. “From 2000 through 2018, greater percentage increases in the rates

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women

To cope with pandemic stress, many women turned to alcohol

Alcohol-related deaths are on the rise in the U.S., a report published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds.

The report, from the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, found that deaths from alcohol use increased by 43 percent from 2006 to 2018.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

The findings, which don’t include data from this year, come as other research highlights how drinking remains a problem for many in the U.S., particularly among women.

Indeed, the CDC report found that the impact was greatest on women. “While rates were higher for males than females for each year,” the study authors wrote, “the rate of change was greater for females.”

The report didn’t give reasons for the increase among women, but it suggested that women living far outside city limits may have been more at risk. “From 2000 through 2018, greater percentage increases in the rates

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