women

Anita Hill Study Finds Women Twice as Likely to Be Bullied at Work

Bullying runs rampant in Hollywood and is largely unchecked, serving as a gateway to sexual harassment and abuse in the workplace. And women are twice as likely to experience abusive workplace conduct than men.

These troubling, yet perhaps unsurprising, pieces of information come from Anita Hill’s Hollywood Commission, which has released its third round of research from a groundbreaking industry-wide survey that aims to improve workplace safety and equality across all of entertainment. The survey, which was conducted over the course of three months, included nearly 10,000 participants who are working in Hollywood.

“I was told that, ‘It’s not illegal to be an a–hole,’” one survey participant wrote anonymously.

“I see that bullying is becoming more and more of an issue — it’s just an abuse of power in a different form,” another anonymous participant said. “And if you don’t put up with it, they will hire someone else who

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clothing

Kim Kardashian stays up late to study the law… Kanye West ‘will create God Save America clothing’

Kim Kardashian stayed up late on Monday evening to study the law with a focus on defamation.

The 39-year-old reality TV star, whose father Robert was a lawyer, is studying the law with several California professors to prepare for the bar.

This comes after it was revealed her husband Kanye West plans to create ‘God Save America’ clothing; the rapper filed for the trademark last week.

Brainy beauty: Kim Kardashian stayed up late on Monday evening to study the law with a focus on defamation

The Bound 2 singer has filed a patent to have the slogan – thought to be part of his Presidential campaign – adorned on t-shirts, jumpers and hoodies, similar to Donald Trump’s ‘Make America Great Again’ slogan, TMZ reported. 

Kim seems to be doing her own thing. She said on her Instagram Stories on Monday that she was working hard while flashing images of her

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style

Newt Gingrich says Trump should study Pence’s debating style

Impressed by the vice president’s performance at Wednesday night’s debate, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich said President Trump could learn a thing or two about the art of debating from his right-hand man.

Gingrich said Friday that Vice President Mike Pence was calm and that Trump should study the way he sparred with Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris ahead of at least one more scheduled debate with Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

“I thought Vice President Pence did a remarkable job the other night, which I really hope the president will study,” Gingrich told Harris Faulkner on Fox News. “He wasn’t hostile. He just stayed on her. And I think, as a result, he had a very good evening. And the country had a much better sense of what a radical Kamala Harris is.”

Trump and Biden’s first presidential debate was on Sept. 29. The two were scheduled to meet

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style

Newt Gingrich urged Trump to ‘study’ Pence’s debating style: ‘He wasn’t hostile’

Former Speaker Newt GingrichNewton (Newt) Leroy GingrichMORE (R-Ga.) praised Vice President Pence for his “remarkable” debate performance against Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisBiden campaign raises over M on day of VP debate Deadline accidentally publishes story about Pence being diagnosed with COVID-19 Companies distance from pro-Trump commentator after vulgar Harris tweet MORE (D-Calif.) on Wednesday night, and urged President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden campaign raises over M on day of VP debate Trump chastises Whitmer for calling him ‘complicit’ in extremism associated with kidnapping scheme Trump says he hopes to hold rally Saturday despite recent COVID-19 diagnosis MORE to “study” Pence’s style in preparing for his next debate against Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden campaign raises over M on day of VP debate Experts predict record election turnout as more than 6.6 million ballots cast in early voting tally Trump-appointed global media chief sued over allegations of pro-Trump agenda MORE

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women

Women Are Better Than Men at Wearing Masks and Following Coronavirus Precautions, Study Finds

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In most states, people are required to wear a mask in public places to prevent the further spread of COVID-19. But women do a far better job of wearing masks than men, a new study found.

Women are also more likely than men to follow all COVID-19 precautions, like washing hands, staying home and social distancing. Plus, they’re more likely to follow news about the virus from medical experts, their governor, social media and by reading about how other countries have handled the pandemic — and in turn, experience anxiety and alarm.

For the study, published in the journal Behavioral Science & Policy, researchers at New York University and Yale University surveyed 800 people about their COVID-19 habits, counted mask-wearers on the street over two days and analyzed Americans’ movements with smartphone data.

RELATED: COVID-19 Cases Dropped 15 Percent in South Carolina Areas with Mask Mandates, Increased Without

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women

Women bear brunt of Covid-related work stress, UK study finds

Women are being disproportionately affected by a rise in mental health problems caused by increasing workloads as people do their jobs from home amid the pandemic.



a person standing in front of a laptop computer: Photograph: borchee/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: borchee/Getty Images

The length of the working day has increased steadily, resulting in a 49% rise in mental distress reported by employees when compared with 2017-19. Women are bearing the brunt of problems as they juggle work and childcare, according to a report by the 4 Day Week campaign and thinktanks Compass and Autonomy.

The report, Burnout Britain, comes a day before World Mental Health Day and shows that women are 43% more likely to have increased their hours beyond a standard working week than men, and for those with children, this was even more clearly associated with mental health problems: 86% of women who are carrying out a standard working week alongside childcare, which is more than

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women

Women May Be More Likely To Get Anxiety From Occasional Cannabis Use Than Men, Study Finds

Cannabis is a complicated drug when it comes to anxiety. While some report that cannabis makes them feel more relaxed, others find that it can cause heightened anxiety, paranoia, and restlessness. Research tells us that these differences can be related to a variety of factors, such as the dose or the type of cannabis used. 

Now researchers are pointing to another factor that could be important in whether cannabis causes or relieves anxiety – biological sex. According to a new study from John Hopkins University, women may be more likely than men to get anxiety-related symptoms from occasional cannabis use. 

The researchers on this study were looking to see if there were any notable differences between men and women when it came to the side effects of occasional cannabis use. They were also interested in exploring this in the context of non-smoked

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women

Pregnancy rates hit new lows for women 24 and younger, new highs for women 35 and older: study

Pregnancy rates among women aged 24 or younger hit record lows in 2016, while rates for women aged 35 and older reached new highs, according to a new analysis published Thursday by Guttmacher, a sexual and reproductive health research organization.

Meanwhile, abortion rates have also declined for young people over the past 25 years, partially due to a decline in the number of people in that age group who became pregnant.

“Pregnancy rates for young people have reached their lowest recorded levels, and both birth and abortion rates among young people are continuing a longstanding decline over the past two-and-a-half decades,” said Guttmacher Senior Research Associate Isaac Maddow-Zimet.

“Conversely, pregnancy rates among older age groups have reached historic highs, with abortion rates remaining fairly constant.”

Guttmacher’s count of pregnancies includes ones that end in births, abortions, miscarriages and stillbirths.

In 2016, the latest year for which comprehensive data is available,

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women

Study reveals high levels of discrimination against women in football

Women in Football chair Ebru Koksal. Photo by Stuart Franklin – FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images

Two-thirds of women working in football have experienced discrimination but only 12% reported it to the relevant authorities, according to a study conducted by Women in Football.

The network revealed the findings of its largest-ever survey on Thursday morning, polling over 4,000 members and revealing only 59% believe their organisation celebrates female talent.

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The most common form of discrimination was described as “misused banter” with 52% reporting they had either experienced or witnessed this with 82% stating they had face further obstacles in their football industry career.

Sources: Utd missed all of Ole’s targets
• Study: Women face high levels of prejudice
• England’s party trio won’t play vs. Wales
• Spot-kick legend Paneka in ICU for COVID
• Argentina

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women

Pregnant women have COVID-19 symptoms that last longer than average, study finds

Pregnant women with COVID-19 can have symptoms that last more than two months, far longer than the average patient, according to a new study published in Obstetrics & Gynecology on Wednesday.

The study, led by researchers at the University of California–San Francisco and University of California–Los Angeles, is the largest study to date of non-hospitalized pregnant women. A quarter of the 594 women studied had COVID-19 symptoms that lasted two months or longer. Non-pregnant patients who experience symptoms for more than a month or two after testing positive are informally known as “long-haulers.”

“We found that pregnant people with COVID-19 can expect a prolonged time with symptoms,” senior author Vanessa L. Jacoby, MD, MAS, vice chair of research in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences at UCSF, and co-principal investigator of the national pregnancy study, said in a statement. “COVID-19 symptoms during pregnancy can last a

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