women

Sue Bird and rest of league dedicated 2020 to more than basketball

It’s officially been over for almost a week, but it’s never too late to give the WNBA its flowers for an incredible 2020 season, one that will be remembered far more for the leadership and impact players made off the court than for the games on the court — though those were amazing too.

Before entering the “wubble,” confined to courts and housing at IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida, to minimize the risk of catching or spreading COVID-19 (something else they did quite successfully, by the way), players decided to dedicate the shortened season to racial justice and particularly Breonna Taylor, the young Black woman killed in her own home by Louisville Police officers in March.

Say her name, they demanded. Not just in the opening days or after the first couple of games, but for the entirety of the three months they held the regular season and playoffs: it

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shopping

As pandemic restrictions on indoor shopping ease, mall owners sue to stop another shutdown

ARCADIA, CA - OCTOBER 07, 2020 - Shoppers walk past a "Sanitize on the Go," station to keep shoppers safe from coronavirus at the Westfield Santa Anita shopping mall in Arcadia on October 7, 2020. This is the first day customers return to indoor shopping after Los Angeles County eases restrictions and have reopened the malls and the individual stores. Such stores have been closed for weeks, but reopened Wednesday at 25% capacity. Westfield Santa Anita has placed Covid-related signage with one-way traffic, 6 feet distancing when waiting to get into individual stores, hand sanitizing stations and mask are required before entering the mall. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
Shoppers walk past a “Sanitize on the Go,” station at the Westfield Santa Anita shopping mall in Arcadia. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Indoor shopping centers opened Wednesday as Los Angeles County officials eased pandemic-related restrictions on businesses, but one of the biggest mall operators in the region is suing to stop the county from shutting down centers again.

The owners of Westfield-branded malls, Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield, filed a proposed class action lawsuit against the county in late September that called for the county to lift prohibitions it called “unlawful and unjustifiable” in part because they are targeted at indoor centers, which were then mostly closed.

Although the county gave the green light to indoor mall stores operating with limits on the number of customers who can be inside, Westfield is suing in federal court to stop officials from repeatedly opening and closing stores to blunt the impact of the pandemic.

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jewelry

Downtown Portland jewelry store intends to sue city for handling of protests

A downtown Portland jewelry store owner intends to sue the City of Portland for its handling of protests in late May.

Noha Kassab, CEO of Kassab Jewelers, said her family-owned store was was broken into and looted early in the morning on May 30. This was during the beginning stages of what would lead to more than 100 days of protest in Portland.

“I started looking on my phone to see who was in my store, it was bunch of people going into the store, broke glass, it was the most painful, disheartening experience I ever faced,” said Kassab.

The store owner said they are still calculating the costs, but estimates $2.5 million in damages.

“I’m not someone who came to this country with money. I came with an American dream. To see my American dream destroyed and it could have been preventable, is disheartening,” said Kassab.

Kassab filed tort

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women

Black women sue Denver over alleged racial, gender discrimination in fire department

Two Black women sued the city of Denver on Wednesday over allegations that members of the Denver Fire Department systematically discriminated against them both because of their gender and their race.

Da Lesha Allen and Charmaine Cassie say they unfairly faced tougher standards and stricter scrutiny than their white male colleagues, and that colleagues and supervisors made racist comments about their hair and bodies and applied racist stereotypes to the women after they joined the department in 2019 and 2018, respectively.

One fire captain told Cassie that she would struggle to get through the fire department’s training program because of the department’s culture, and said that she should “keep her head down and act like a slave” in order to graduate from the training, according to the lawsuit.

A lieutenant commented several times on Cassie’s body, including declaring that she had a “big butt,” according to the federal lawsuit. In

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jewelry

Downtown jewelry store stripped of valuables by rioters intends to sue city

A longtime downtown jeweler intends to sue the City of Portland, alleging that the Police Bureau and city politicians failed to protect downtown merchants from thieves that broke into her store in a May 30 riot.

Noha Kassab, owner of Kassab Jewelers, filed a tort claim notice with the city last month. She claims the store was stripped of valuables, including $1.5 million worth of diamonds, rubies and other gems. Together with the damage to the store and its fixtures and lost profits, Kassab informed the city she will seek $2.5 million in damages.

The Kassab store was one of several high-end retailers hit by thieves in a wild spree of vandalism, arson and smash-and-grab late in the night of May 30. The night of plundering further scarred a downtown already burdened by COVID-19 restrictions, the associated recession and widespread homelessness.

Four months later, storefronts through much of downtown remain

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