women

How Have Women Voted Since Suffrage? It’s Complicated | History

A century has elapsed since the 19th Amendment granted women the right to vote at the federal level. But no single analysis of those 100 years can explain “the women’s vote,” as it’s impossible to summarize half of the country’s population with one political narrative.

That aside, for political scientists and historians, a dive into how the women’s vote has shaped elections and campaigning offers fascinating insights into presidential politics. Initially, in the years after suffrage, women’s turnout at the polls lagged, but since 1980, a higher proportion of women vote in presidential elections than men. Women also differ from men in their political choices, a fact that should put to bed the myth that that’s persisted for a century—that women vote just like their husbands. This idea taps sexist assumptions about men’s domestic control and women’s political disinterest, rather than the simple reality that marriages are founded on shared

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women

Key facts about women’s suffrage around the world

A woman casts her ballot at a polling station in Soweto in April 1994 for South Africa’s first free and democratic general election. (Brooks Kraft LLC/Sygma via Getty Images)

This year marks the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which guarantees women the right to vote. But the United States was hardly the first country to codify women’s suffrage, and barriers to vote persisted for some groups of U.S. women for decades. At least 20 nations preceded the U.S., according to a Pew Research Center analysis of women’s enfranchisement measures in 198 countries and self-administering territories. Today, none of these 198 countries and territories bar women from voting because of their sex; some countries do not hold national elections.

Here is a closer look at the history of women’s suffrage around the world. This analysis focuses on when women in each country won

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women

What If Women’s Suffrage Never Happened?

Photo credit: Justin Sullivan
Photo credit: Justin Sullivan

From Marie Claire

There’s a tendency, when looking back on the history of women’s suffrage in the United States, to assume that it was inevitable that women would get the right to vote: By the time Tennessee became the final state to ratify the 19th Amendment, on August 18, 1920, 15 states had already granted women suffrage, starting with Wyoming, which became a state in 1890. (As a territory, it gave women suffrage in 1869.) How long could such an electoral-rights imbalance reasonably be expected to survive?

Then again, was it really inevitable? The amendment’s passage was the culmination of probably the longest sustained sociopolitical movement in American history, and even so it came down to a single 24-year-old Tennessee state legislator’s vote—changed from nay to aye after his mother wrote him a letter lobbying him to do so—or it wouldn’t have happened, at least

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VocalEssence choir to launch its virtual season with a celebration of women’s suffrage

Amid continuing uncertainty over when live performances will be possible again, Twin Cities choir VocalEssence has announced its plans for an all-digital 2020-21 season.

Eight specially recorded programs will be presented on a new website called “VocalEssence on Demand,” for streaming on a variety of devices including computer, tablet, smartphone, or smart television.

“The coronavirus pandemic has placed stresses on all performers, performing arts organizations and venues,” VocalEssence artistic director Philip Brunelle commented.

“But the crisis is not without opportunity, and VocalEssence is thrilled our audiences new and old can listen and watch whenever they choose, wherever they happen to be.”

Four of the new programs feature the main VocalEssence Chorus and the Ensemble Singers, its chamber choir.

The season starts Oct. 18 with “Rightfully Hers,” a concert commemorating the centenary of women’s suffrage in the United States, with music by Mabel Daniels, Alice Parker, Jocelyn Hagen and others.

The

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