style

‘They’ve Got Their Own Poppy Style’

You might not know his name just yet, but if you’ve turned on the radio or looked at any of the most popular playlists on platforms like Spotify or Apple
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Music in the past month or so, you’ve heard the unmistakable horns featured in rising talent Jawsh 685’s breakout smash “Savage Love (Laxed – Siren Beat).”

The tune, originally just a lyric-less beat that went viral, has now become a proper pop hit thanks in part to Jason Derulo, who found the cut and decided he needed to write words and sing along to the infectious tune. Thankfully, he did.

Already, “Savage Love (Laxed – Siren Beat)” has reached the No. 1 spot on charts all around the world, and just a few days ago, a new version of the cut was released which features BTS, the biggest band in the world. The future

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wedding

What Should You Do If You Spot an Error on Your Wedding Paper Goods After They’ve Been Printed?

Katherine Ann Rose

Whether you worked on the design for your wedding-related paper goods—including the save-the-date, invitation, ceremony programs, signage, escort cards, and dinner menu—for five days or five weeks, there’s something undeniably exciting about the day they finally arrive in your possession. Sure, looking at the proofs gives you a good idea about what the final design will look like, but there’s nothing quite like holding the tangible pieces in your hands. That’s why unboxing your paper goods and spotting a big, ugly typo you never caught in the proofing process is so upsetting. And while it’s unlikely, especially because the majority of stationers insist on a multi-step proofing process (during which you’ll check and double-check that the information and spelling on each piece of paper is correct), mistakes do occur from time to time. According to Britt Rohr of Swell Press, “It’s the worst case, but it has

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women

Women Value Their Group Texts in Normal Times. During the Pandemic They’ve Become a Lifeline

An illustration of people climbing on text messages to symbolize a group text
An illustration of people climbing on text messages to symbolize a group text

Credit – Illustration by Sol Cotti for TIME

When S got COVID, letting us know on a group text we had mostly used before to schedule dinners, we all texted her privately to tell her she’d be fine, to comfort her, to ask her how she was. You’re young and healthy, we said. We crowdsourced breathing exercises from doctors and advice from friends of friends and sent them to the group. But also, it was April in New York and there were sirens all day and night outside our windows. To one another, in a separate group, we texted questions. We commiserated over the fact that, really, we had no idea if she’d be fine.

There is something particular about right now that seems primed for the group text. It’s a group, first and foremost, when those

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fashion

From designers to Anna Wintour, fashion industry leaders say they are determined to improve diversity. How will we know whether they’ve succeeded?

In May, after the death of George Floyd while in police custody, activists poured into the streets with demands for racial justice and police reform. That multiethnic chorus expanded into a call for equity in every corner of the culture, from politics to fashion. In response, social media was quickly flooded with fashion companies, influencers and boldface names touting their support of Black Lives Matter with symbolic black squares and historical quotations about racial equality. The words of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and James Baldwin were in heavy rotation. But like a litany of “thoughts and prayers,” the brief messages resonated as perfunctory rather than instructive.

“A lot of people posted on Instagram, ‘We stand in solidarity.’ What does that even mean?” says designer Tom Ford, who serves as chairman of the Council of Fashion Designers of America. This is not the first time outrage has overflowed its

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