women

Megan Thee Stallion writes New York Times op-ed on protecting Black women

Megan Thee Stallion wrote a New York Times op-ed addressing her activism and the disrespect Black women face. The editorial, titled “Why I Speak Up For Black Women,” explored Megan’s experience as a Black woman in hip-hop and explained why she’s no longer afraid of criticism.

“In the weeks leading up to the election, Black women are expected once again to deliver victory for Democratic candidates,” she wrote in the piece, which was published Tuesday. “We have gone from being unable to vote legally to a highly courted voting bloc – all in little more than a century. Despite this and despite the way so many have embraced messages about racial justice this year, Black women are still constantly disrespected and disregarded in so many areas of life.”

In the op-ed, Megan addressed her own personal struggles with being respected, including her July altercation with rapper Tory Lanez. Nearly a

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women

Megan Thee Stallion Pens New York Times Op-Ed, Says ‘’Protect Black Women’ Should Not Be Controversial’

My dad emailed me about a week ago, with a barrage of questions: “Did you watch Saturday Night Live? Did you see the musical artist? What did you think of her performance?”

He was referring to Megan Thee Stallion, an artist he’d previously been unfamiliar with and wasn’t entirely sure he understood—specifically, how to reconcile her unapologetically sex-positive image (by her own design) with the mid-song declaration she made in defense of Black women while performing her hit, “Savage” on SNL. For my pops—and no doubt many others well-accustomed to the traditional “good girl/bad girl” binary, Meg’s identity as both righteous and ratchet might prove challenging, at first glance.

Megan Thee Stallion Calls Out Kentucky AG Daniel Cameron in Powerful SNL Performance, and Issa Rae’s Got Next for Hosting

My dad’s always been a fast learner (a trait he thankfully passed on), and we had a brief but

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women

Men got 3 times more promotions than women

Working mothers are being disportionately affected by the coronavirus pandemic — and experts fear it could have a significant impact on their financial future.

From job losses to career downsizing, women are feeling the hit.

When it comes to promotions, they are also being left behind: 34% of men working remotely with children at home said they received a promotion, versus 9% of women in the same situation, according to an August study by software company Qualtrics and theBoardlist, which focuses on gender parity in the boardroom. The study of 1,051 salaried U.S. employees was conducted July 9-13.

In addition, 26% of men with children at home said they received a pay raise while working remotely, compared to 13% of women with children at home.

More from Invest in You:
How pandemic has upended the financial lives of average Americans
Working women are in the ‘bull’s-eye’ of the recession. How

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women

About 4 times as many women than men reported they were unemployed last month



a man standing in front of a brick building: Pekic/Getty Images


© Pekic/Getty Images
Pekic/Getty Images

  • Four times as many women than men have left the workforce in September, according to a new report from The 19th, a nonprofit newsroom covering gender and politics. 
  • About 865,000 women in the country reported in September that they were no longer employed, compared to 216,000 men, the report said. 
  • The massive discrepancy between the number of men and women who left the workforce illustrates how women are largely struggling to stay afloat as the coronavirus pandemic continues.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Four times as many women than men have left the workforce in September, according to a new report.

About 865,000 women in the country reported in September that they were no longer employed, compared to 216,000 men, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data reported by The 19th, a nonprofit news organization focusing on gender and politics.

The US Bureau

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style

Tariq Zaidi photographed a world-famous Congolese style tradition that’s changing with the times

Often referred to as “dandies” of the Congo, “sapeurs” and “sapeuses” are men, women and children whose sharp and stylish way of dressing has caught the world’s attention. Below, photographer Tariq Zaidi writes about his own experiences immortalizing some of the followers of “La Sape,” describing how the tradition first started and how it has evolved with the times in an edited excerpt from the book “Sapeurs: Ladies and Gentlemen of the Congo.” All opinions expressed in this article belong to the author.

Between 2017 and 2019, I traveled to Brazzaville in the Republic of the Congo and Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) to meet whole families of sapeurs, including female “sapeuses” and mini “sapes” in training.

My aim was to highlight the important role “La Sape” plays in their defiance of circumstance, through the stark contrast of the elegance of their dress against the harsh

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women

Women Value Their Group Texts in Normal Times. During the Pandemic They’ve Become a Lifeline

An illustration of people climbing on text messages to symbolize a group text
An illustration of people climbing on text messages to symbolize a group text

Credit – Illustration by Sol Cotti for TIME

When S got COVID, letting us know on a group text we had mostly used before to schedule dinners, we all texted her privately to tell her she’d be fine, to comfort her, to ask her how she was. You’re young and healthy, we said. We crowdsourced breathing exercises from doctors and advice from friends of friends and sent them to the group. But also, it was April in New York and there were sirens all day and night outside our windows. To one another, in a separate group, we texted questions. We commiserated over the fact that, really, we had no idea if she’d be fine.

There is something particular about right now that seems primed for the group text. It’s a group, first and foremost, when those

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women

‘I Got Punched Many Times’

Jason Alexander does not have fond memories of the aftermath of “Pretty Woman.”

In case you forgot, the “Seinfeld” star was in the 1990 film alongside Richard Gere and Julia Roberts — but he played a rather unsavory role that left a bad taste in the mouths of some fans.

″Women hated me,″ the actor shared on the At Home With the Creative Coalition podcast. ″I would walk down the street and women would say mean things to me. I got punched many times, I got spit on by one woman. It was a rough year.”

Alexander played attorney Philip Stuckey, an associate of Gere’s businessman character Edward, who tries to sexually assault Roberts’ Vivian before Gere pulls him off of her, punches him in the nose, and throws him and his briefcase out the door. Watch a clip of the scene here.

Also Read: Watch Jerry Stiller Make Julia

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fashion

Fashion in pictures: Milan Fashion Week signals happier and sunnier times

Despite Covid-19 restrictions, Milan Fashion Week proved that the show must, and will always, go on. And it wasn’t all doom and gloom too. Designers showcased collections that remind of happier days to come (or, of the past).

Many labels sent out clothes walking the line of themes like “renewal”,”escapism” and “hope”. Optimism was big on the Milan runways for Spring/Summer 2021.

Read more: Unsexy selfies and huffy fashionistas take centre stage at Milan Fashion Week

Although, it saw scores of influencers and buyers nursing bruised egos. The reduced number of seats for physicals shows meant organisers had to be really selective when sending out invites.

Face masks were mandated for guests, as well. Selfies in front of the runway for social media, thus became something less glamorous compared to past years.

Read more: Want to be in the fashion week front row? Check out TikTok or Pinterest

“In this

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