women

The pandemic could undo years of gains for women in the workforce

  • A survey of some 40,000 employees by McKinsey and Co. and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s nonprofit Lean In found that 1 out of every 4 working women is considering leaving the workforce or scaling back their hours.
  • Women cite struggling with childcare and household duties as a major concern.
  • While 51% of employers communicate the importance of avoiding burnout, only 37% have changed their performance review process amid the pandemic.
  • In order to prevent a mass exodus of women in the workforce, managers should give employees more time off, increase flexible hours, and reassess performance goals and metrics set before the pandemic.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

One out of every 4 working women is considering leaving the workforce or scaling back their careers because of the pandemic, according to a survey of over 40,000 professionals by McKinsey and Co. and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s nonprofit Lean In.

Read More Read more
women

COVID-19 could undo 6 years of gains for women in the workplace: Study

The coronavirus pandemic has the potential to undo years of gains for women in the workplace, according to a massive new study on the state of women in corporate America released on Wednesday.



a person standing in front of a building: A woman poses holding a laptop computer in a corporate business settting in an undated stock image.


© STOCK IMAGE/D3sign/Getty Images
A woman poses holding a laptop computer in a corporate business settting in an undated stock image.

At least one in four women are considering downshifting their careers or leaving the workforce because of COVID-19, according to the annual Women in the Workplace study from LeanIn.org and consulting firm McKinsey & Company. The study involved 317 companies representing over 12 million employees.

Loading...

Load Error

This marks the first time in six years of the annual report that the researchers found evidence of women intending to leave their jobs at higher rates than men. Researchers also warned this exodus could possibly undo all the gains women have made in management and senior leadership roles

Read More Read more