women

Nikola founder sues Utah businessman for defamation over tweets about women

Nikola founder Trevor Milton has sued a Utah businessman for defamation, accusing him of a “malicious campaign to harass” and discredit the billionaire by publicly accusing him over Twitter of sexually abusing women, according to the lawsuit filed Monday.

David Bateman, the founder and CEO of software company Entrata, started tweeting about Milton in late September, posting screenshots of conversations he allegedly had with women who said Milton tried to sexually assault them or propositioned them for sex with other men. In some cases, Bateman posted screenshots from women of conversations they had with Milton. One showed Milton allegedly offering to pay a woman $2,000 to “hook up” with a guy in Las Vegas if he could pick out the man. 

The nine-page lawsuit filed in Utah federal court says Bateman “engaged in a malicious campaign to harass and defame Mr. Milton, using Bateman’s Twitter account to publish a series

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model

LDS Church’s northern Utah ranch is proving to be a model for Western livestock grazing

Livestock grazing has taken a heavy toll on Western rangelands since the arrival of domestic cattle and sheep that were bred for much damper climates.



a man that is standing in the grass: (Brett Prettyman | Tribune file photo) Rick Danvir, wildlife manager for Deseret Land and Livestock Ranch, points out a popular elk area while touring the private land in northern Utah with Boyd Blackwell of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, in this 2008 file photo. The 200,000-acre Rich County ranch is one of many large agricultural operations owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints around the nation.


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(Brett Prettyman | Tribune file photo) Rick Danvir, wildlife manager for Deseret Land and Livestock Ranch, points out a popular elk area while touring the private land in northern Utah with Boyd Blackwell of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, in this 2008 file photo. The 200,000-acre Rich County ranch is one of many large agricultural operations owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints around the nation.

These animals, which have contributed greatly to the West’s pioneer heritage, have damaged fragile alpine and desert ecosystems, fouled stream corridors and rearranged native plant communities, environmentalist say.

While they contend public lands grazing is not sustainable in its time-worn form, Utah’s notably dry and cold Monte Cristo

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