women

Women And The Pandemic Workplace: Leadership’s Critical New Challenges

Leadership’s responsibility for assuring gender equality within the workplace just received an important, highly public “push.” The sixth annual Women in the Workplace study by McKinsey and LeanIn.org, featured in a recent special edition of The Wall Street Journal, concludes that women have born an outsized workplace-related burden during the Covid-19 economy, which could have long term consequences if not promptly addressed.

The message to corporate leadership is clear— either invest in a more flexible workplace or risk losing women employees, especially in leadership.

In many respects, this important message comes at a most inopportune time. Corporate leaders are already struggling to manage pandemic-related operational, financial and strategic concerns, while confronting nontraditional issues such as underrepresented communities, social justice and corporate social responsibility. Volatility projected from an unstable economy, a potentially contested national election and a deeply

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model

Microsoft moves to ‘hybrid workplace’ model; will allow some employees to work from home permanently


After almost 8 months of remote work, companies in the Seattle area are beginning to unfold their blueprints of how and when employees will

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women

A Look Back at the History of Women in the Workplace

Mark the year 2059 on your calendar—that’s when data shows that women will finally achieve equal pay to their male counterparts. It’s hard to believe that closing the gender wage gap will take nearly a century after the Equal Pay Act was passed in 1963. In 1960, women only earned about 61 cents for every $1 that a man took home, a number that ticked up to 82 cents by 2018—but that still leaves another 18 cents to go overall. The wage gap is worse for women of color: Among women working full-time jobs in the U.S., Black women are paid 62 cents, Native American women 57 cents, and Latinas 54 cents for every dollar paid to white men, according to the National Partnership for Women & Families.

History of women in the workplace
Barbara Alper / Getty Images

Researchers blame the gender wage gap on a variety of reasons, ranging from differences in the industries

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women

COVID-19 could undo 6 years of gains for women in the workplace: Study

The coronavirus pandemic has the potential to undo years of gains for women in the workplace, according to a massive new study on the state of women in corporate America released on Wednesday.



a person standing in front of a building: A woman poses holding a laptop computer in a corporate business settting in an undated stock image.


© STOCK IMAGE/D3sign/Getty Images
A woman poses holding a laptop computer in a corporate business settting in an undated stock image.

At least one in four women are considering downshifting their careers or leaving the workforce because of COVID-19, according to the annual Women in the Workplace study from LeanIn.org and consulting firm McKinsey & Company. The study involved 317 companies representing over 12 million employees.

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This marks the first time in six years of the annual report that the researchers found evidence of women intending to leave their jobs at higher rates than men. Researchers also warned this exodus could possibly undo all the gains women have made in management and senior leadership roles

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